Sinew

Sin'ew noun [ Middle English sinewe , senewe , Anglo-Saxon sinu , seonu ; akin to Dutch zenuw , Old High German senawa , German sehne , Icelandic sin , Swedish sena , Dan. sene ; confer Sanskrit snāva . √290...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/106

Sinew

Sin'ew transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Sinewed ; present participle & verbal noun Sinewing .] To knit together, or make strong with, or as with, sinews. Shak. « Wretches, now stuck up for long tortures . . . mig...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/106

sinew

1. <anatomy> A tendon or tendonous tissue. See Tendon. ... 2. Muscle; nerve. ... 3. That which supplies strength or power. 'The portion and sinew of her fortune, her marriage dowry.' (Shak) 'The bodies of men, munition, and money, may justly be called the sinews of war.' (Sir W. Raleigh) ... Money alone is often called the sinews of war. ... ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

sinew

(sinĀ“u) a tendon of a muscle. weeping sinew an encysted ganglion, chiefly on the back of the hand, containing synovial fluid.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Sinew

• (n.) Muscle; nerve. • (n.) Fig.: That which supplies strength or power. • (v. t.) To knit together, or make strong with, or as with, sinews. • (n.) A tendon or tendonous tissue. See Tendon.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/sinew/

sinew

Type: Term Pronunciation: sin′ū Synonyms: tendon
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=82183

Sinew

Sinew is a tough piece of tissue that connects a muscle to a bone and helps the muscle to move the bone. In humans, it is more commonly called a tendon. Animal sinew can be used to bind wood, bone, or other materials together. The wooden planks of the canoe were fastened together with animal sinew.
Found on https://www.nps.gov/subjects/islandofthebluedolphins/glossary.htm
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