subject

  1. some situation or event that is thought about
  2. a branch of knowledge
  3. something (a person or object or scene) selected by an artist or photographer for graphic representation
  4. a person who owes allegiance to that nation
  5. (linguistics) one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the grammatical constituent about which something is predicated
  6. (logic) the first term of a propos......

    Subject

    • (a.) Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation. • (a.) Obedient; submissive. • (a.) That which is placed under the authority, dominion, control, or influence of something else. • (a.) That in which any quality, attribute, or relation, whether spiritual or material, inheres, or to which any of these apperta...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/subject/

    subject

    (from the article `fugue`) ...the ingredients of a fugue are relatively few and the procedures are straightforward. The first section, always included, is the exposition, ... The recapitulation presents the principal subject matter of the movement in a new state of equilibrium. The main subjects of the exposition are heard ... [2 rel...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/178

    subject

    (from the article `logic`) ...proposition as conclusion. When arguments of this type have exactly three terms occurring throughout the argument and when the predicate term of ... ...certain kinds of propositions that can be analyzed as consisting of (1) usually a quantifier (`every,` `some,` or the universal negative...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/178

    subject

    (from the article `Uralic languages`) The widespread use of separate subjective and objective conjugations among the Uralic languages (as in Mordvin, Ugric, and Samoyedic) are the result ... in grammar, form of a verb indicating the relation between the participants in a narrated event (subject, object) and the event itself. Common ......
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/178

    Subject

    (Lat. subjicere to place under) a) In Epistemology: The subject of knowledge is the individual knower considered either as a pure ego (see Ego, Pure), a transcendental ego (see Ego, Transcendental) or an act of awareness. (See Awareness). b) In Psychology: The psychological subject is the individual subjected to observation. Thus the introspective....
    Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/s.html

    subject

    (sub´jәkt) a person or animal subjected to treatment, observation, or experiment.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

    subject

    1. That which is placed under the authority, dominion, control, or influence of something else. ... 2. Specifically: One who is under the authority of a ruler and is governed by his laws; one who owes allegiance to a sovereign or a sovereign state; as, a subject of Queen Victoria; a British subject; a subject of the United States. 'Was never subjec...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

    subject

    noun a person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures; someone who is an object of investigation; `the subjects for this investigation were selected randomly`; `the cases that we studied were drawn from two different communities`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    subject

    dependent adjective being under the power or sovereignty of another or others; `subject peoples`; `a dependent prince`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    subject

    (grammar) Traditionally, one of the two main parts of a sentence, the other being the predicate. In grammar, the noun or pronoun that carries out the action of the verb in a sentence, as in `The dog chased the cat`. The subject also controls the form and number of ...
    Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038755.html

    Subject

    [documents] In library and information science documents (such as books, articles and pictures) are classified and searched by subject - as well as by other attributes such as author, genre and document type. This makes `subject` a fundamental term in this field. Library and information specialists assign subject labels to documents to make...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subject_(documents)

    Subject

    [grammar] The subject (abbreviated {sc|sub} or {sc|su}) is, according to a tradition that can be traced back to Aristotle (and that is associated with phrase structure grammars), one of the two main constituents of a clause, the other constituent being the predicate, whereby the predicate says something about the subject. According to a tra...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subject_(grammar)

    Subject

    [philosophy] A subject is a being who has a unique consciousness and unique experiences, or an entity that has a relationship with another entity that exists outside of itself (called an `object`). A subject is an observer and an object is a thing observed. This concept is especially important in continental philosophy, where `the Subject` ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subject_(philosophy)

    Subject

    [programming] In computer programming within the subject-oriented programming paradigm, subjects are a way to separate concerns. For example, in a Shape class with two methods Draw and Move, each method would be considered a subject. ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subject_(programming)

    Subject

    Sub·ject' adjective [ Middle English suget , Old French souzget , sougit (in which the first part is Latin subtus below, from sub under), subgiet , subject , French sujet , from Latin subjectus lying under, subjected, past participle o...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/222

    Subject

    Sub·ject' noun [ From Latin subjectus , through an old form of French sujet . See Subject , adjective ] 1. That which is placed under the authority, dominion, control, or influence of something else. 2. Specifically: One who is under the a...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/223

    Subject

    Sub·ject' transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Subjected ; present participle & verbal noun Subjecting .] 1. To bring under control, power, or dominion; to make subject; to subordinate; to subdue. « Firmness of min...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/223

    subject

    a general term for any rational person who is capable of having knowledge. (Cf. object; see also representation.)
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21178

    subject

    a general term for any rational person who is capable of having knowledge. See also representation. (Cf. object.)
    Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm

    subject

    A noun or pronoun which governs a verb (ie its inflection): I love you.
    Found on http://quick-facts.co.uk/language/grammar.html

    Subject

    A person whose psi ability is being investigated.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20137

    Subject

    A person whose psi ability is being investigated.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20157

    subject

    a volunteer participant in a clinical trial.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22225

    Subject

    In the contemporary psychoanalysis, the human psyche--formed chiefly through the Oedipal Complex. In
    Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Television_%28TV%29/
    No exact match found