resonance

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Bridges) The build-up of oscillatory, or wave-like, motion in an object such as a plucked guitar string or the deck of a suspension bridge in a wind. The control of such motion requires the removal, or absorption, of the energy of the wave, preventing its build-up.

Resonance

[particle physics] In particle physics, a resonance is the peak located around a certain energy found in differential cross sections of scattering experiments. These peaks are associated with subatomic particles (such as nucleons, delta baryons, upsilon mesons) and their excitations. The width of the resonance (Γ) is related to the lifetim...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance_(particle_physics)

resonance

A relationship in which the orbital period of one body is related to that of another by a simple integer fraction, such as 1/2, 2/3, 3/5.
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

resonance

A relationship in which the orbital period of one body is related to that of another by a simple integer fraction, such as 1/2, 2/3, 3/5.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20040

resonance

[n] - an excited state of a stable particle causing a sharp maximum in the probability of absorption of electromagnetic radiation 2. [n] - a vibration of large amplitude produced by a relatively small vibration near the same frequency of vibration as the natural frequency of the resonating system 3. [n] - the quality imparted to voic...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=resonance

Resonance

1) The effect produced when the natural vibration frequency of a body is greatly amplified by reinforcing vibrations at the same or nearly the same frequency from another body.
2) The prolonging of the sound at a certain frequency and the tendency of something to vibrate at a particular frequency after the source of energy is removed.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Resonance

A frequency at which a material object will vibrate. In a filter with resonance, a signal will be accentuated at the cutoff frequency. The characteristic of a filter that allows it to selectively pass a narrow range of frequencies. See Q
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Resonance

The resonant frequency of a system is defined as the frequency for which the response of the system is a maximum. If the excitation frequency is either increased or decreased the amplitude of response will decrease. See also: Anti Resonance, Quality Factor, Resonant Frequency.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/r/e/resonance/source.html

resonance

In the context of chemistry, the term refers to the representation of the electronic structure of a molecular entity in terms of contributing structures. Resonance among contributing structures means that the wavefunction is represented by 'mixing' the wavefunctions of the contributing structures. The concept is the basis of the quantum mechanical ...
Found on http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/gtpoc/R.html

Resonance

The concept in which two or more equivalent dot formulas for the same arrangement of atoms (resonance structures) are necessary to describe the bonding in a molecule or ion.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20728

resonance

Description of the ground state of a molecule with delocalized electrons as an average of several Lewis structures. The actual ground state doesn't switch rapidly between the separate structures: it is an average.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/r.shtml

Resonance

Forced vibration of a true single DoF system causes resonance when the forcing frequency equals the natural frequency. More complex systems have many resonances
Found on http://www.reliability-plus.co.uk/PRE/glossary.html

resonance

A state where the natural frequency of a body equals an applied frequency
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

Resonance

Res'o·nance noun [ Confer French résonance , Latin resonantia an echo.] 1. The act of resounding; the quality or state of being resonant. 2. (Acoustics) A prolongation or increase of any sound, either by reflection, as in a cavern or apartment the walls of which a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/62

resonance

1. The act of resounding; the quality or state of being resonant. ... 2. <physics> A prolongation or increase of any sound, eithar by reflection, as in a cavern or apartment the walls of which are not distant enough to return a distinct echo, or by the production of vibrations in other bodies, as a sounding-board, or the bodies of musical ins...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

resonance

noun a vibration of large amplitude produced by a relatively small vibration near the same frequency of vibration as the natural frequency of the resonating system
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

resonance

(rez´o-nәns) the prolongation and intensification of sound produced by transmission of its vibrations to a cavity, especially such a sound elicited by percussion. Decrease of resonance is called dullness; its increase, flatness. a vocal sound heard on auscultation. mesomerism.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Resonance

• (n.) An electric phenomenon corresponding to that of acoustic resonance, due to the existance of certain relations of the capacity, inductance, resistance, and frequency of an alternating circuit. • (n.) A prolongation or increase of any sound, either by reflection, as in a cavern or apartment the walls of which are not distant enough t...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/resonance/

resonance

in particle physics, an extremely short-lived phenomenon associated with subatomic particles called hadrons that decay via the strong nuclear force. ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/37

resonance

in physics, relatively large selective response of an object or a system that vibrates in step or phase, with an externally applied oscillatory ... [12 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/37

Resonance

A phenomenon of AC circuits where they exhibit relatively large currents at certain frequencies.
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html

Resonance

Usually used to mean 'betatron resonance' when talking about an accelerator; it occurs when some perturbing force in the accelerator distorts the orbit in a periodic way, causing the betatron oscillations to grow larger and larger, until beam is lost or perhaps extracted.
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html

Resonance

unfavorable oscillatory behavior (e.g., slow single step response and settling times) caused by mechanical limitations.
Found on http://www.empiremagnetics.com/glossary/glossary.htm#A

resonance

phenomenon occurring in an physical system when the period of a forced oscillation is such that the characteristic quantity of the oscillation or its time derivative reaches an extremum NOTE - At resonance, the period of the forced oscillation is often close to that of a free oscillation.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=101-14-23

resonance

phenomenon of a system in forced oscillation such that any change, however small, in the frequency of excitation results in a decrease in a response of the system NOTE - The quantity that is the measure of response should be indicated; for example, velocity resonance.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=801-24-05
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