reflection

  1. a calm lengthy intent consideration
  2. the phenomenon of a propagating wave (light or sound) being thrown back from a surface
  3. expression without words
  4. a likeness in which left and right are reversed
  5. a remark expressing careful consideration

reflection

The event occurring when light hits a material and bounces off of it. There are different degrees of reflection, the strongest being light rays bouncing off a smooth, flat, polished surface, such as a mirror, where they bounce off and form a reversed image on the surface. Polished Hematite is a great example describing a reflective mineral, wh...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Reflection

• (n.) The act of reflecting, or turning or sending back, or the state of being reflected. • (n.) Shining; brightness, as of the sun. • (n.) The reverting of the mind to that which has already occupied it; continued consideration; meditation; contemplation; hence, also, that operation or power of the mind by which it is conscious of ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/reflection/

reflection

(from the article `mind, philosophy of`) ...of predictions, the construction of experiments, inductive confirmation, the inventing and testing of contingent generalizations, theories, and ... ...a special way of knowing certain events, specifically by introspection. This is called the `privileged access` view. John Locke, cont...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/25

reflection

(from the article `symmetry`) ...elements of symmetry; i.e., changes in the orientation of the arrangement of atoms seem to leave the atoms unmoved. One such element of symmetry ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/25

Reflection

(Lat. reflectio, from re + flectere, to bend) The knowledge which the mind has of itself and its operations. The term is used in this sense by Locke (cf. Essay, II, 1, § 4) Spinoza (cf. On the Improvement of the Understanding 13) and Leibniz (cf. Monadology, and New Essays, Preface, § 4) but has now largely been supplanted by the term in...
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/r.html

reflection

(re-flek´shәn) a turning or bending back. the folds produced when a membrane passes over the surface of an organ and then passes back to the body wall that it lines. the turning back of a ray of light, sound, or heat when it strikes a surface it does not penetrate. a communicati...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

reflection

1. The act of reflecting, or turning or sending back, or the state of being reflected. Specifically: The return of rays, beams, sound, or the like, from a surface. See Angle of reflection, below. 'The eye sees not itself, But by reflection, by some other things.' (Shak) ... The reverting of the mind to that which has already occupied it; continued ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

reflection

noun the ability to reflect beams or rays
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

reflection

(geometry) In geometry, a transformation that reflects every point on a shape to a point that is the same distance on the opposite side of a fixed line – the mirror line, or line of symmetry. Reflections in two perpendicular axes produce a rotation of 180° (a half turn). For example,...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0036070.html

reflection

(physics) Throwing back or deflection of waves, such as light or sound waves, when they hit a surface. Reflection occurs whenever light falls on an object. The law of reflection states that the angle of incidence (the angle between th...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006047.html

Reflection

[computer graphics] Reflection in computer graphics is used to emulate reflective objects like mirrors and shiny surfaces. Reflection is accomplished in a ray trace renderer by following a ray from the eye to the mirror and then calculating where it bounces from, and continuing the process until no surface is found, or a non-reflective surf...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflection_(computer_graphics)

Reflection

[computer programming] In computer science, reflection is the ability of a computer program to examine (see type introspection) and modify the structure and behavior (specifically the values, meta-data, properties and functions) of the program at runtime. Reflection is most commonly used in high-level virtual machine programming languages l...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflection_(computer_programming)

Reflection

[mathematics] In mathematics, a reflection (also spelled reflexion) is a mapping from a Euclidean space to itself that is an isometry with a hyperplane as a set of fixed points; this set is called the axis (in dimension 2) or plane (in dimension 3) of reflection. The image of a figure by a reflection is its mirror image in the axis or plane...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflection_(mathematics)

reflection

[Noun] A mirror image. A sign or an effect of a particular situation.
Example: High unemployment is a reflection of an economy in trouble.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Reflection

[physics] Reflection is the change in direction of a wavefront at an interface between two different media so that the wavefront returns into the medium from which it originated. Common examples include the reflection of light, sound and water waves. The law of reflection says that for specular reflection the angle at which the wave is inci...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflection_(physics)

Reflection

Re·flec'tion noun [ Latin reflexio : confer French réflexion . See Riflect .] [ Written also reflexion .] 1. The act of reflecting, or turning or sending back, or the state of being reflected. Specifically: (a) The return of rays, beams, sound, or the like...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/35

reflection

a calm, lengthy, intent consideration
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1189825

reflection

a process in which an incident wave, meeting a surface separating two different media, gives rise to another wave called a reflected wave, which propagates away from the surface in the same medium as the incident wave and is interpretable by geometrical optics NOTE - According to the degree of fulfilment of certain geometrical optics conditions, th...
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=705-04-10

reflection

abrupt change in the direction of propagation of a wave that strikes the boundary between different mediums. At least part of the oncoming wave ... [18 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/25

Reflection

All waves can be reflected from an obstacle - for example, water waves can reflect off a harbour wall and light waves can reflect off a mirror. The law of reflection is very simple
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Reflection

deflection of a light beam at the interface between two media.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20089

reflection

deflection of a light beam at the interface between two media.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1427-Reflection

Reflection

If waves are incident upon a reflecting surface (e.g. mirror, harbour wall, etc.) they will obey the law of reflection which states:angle of incidence = angle of reflection, where the angles are measured from the surface normal.Specular ReflectionWhen the energy is scattered in only one direction, where the angle of incidence equals the angle of re...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/r/e/reflection/source.html

reflection

Is the return by a surface of some of the light which falls on that surface.
Found on http://gemologyonline.com/gemology_dictionary.htm
No exact match found