Physiognomy

Physiognomy (from the Gk. physis meaning `nature` and gnomon meaning `judge` or `interpreter`) is the assessment of a person`s character or personality from his or her outer appearance, especially the face. The term can also refer to the general appearance of a person, object, or terrain, without reference to its implied characteristics, as...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physiognomy

Physiognomy

• (n.) The face or countenance, with respect to the temper of the mind; particular configuration, cast, or expression of countenance, as denoting character. • (n.) The art telling fortunes by inspection of the features. • (n.) The general appearance or aspect of a thing, without reference to its scientific characteristics; as, the ph...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/physiognomy/

physiognomy

(fiz″e-og´nә-me) facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Physiognomy

Phys`i·og'no·my noun ; plural Physiognomies . [ Middle English fisonomie , phisonomie , fisnamie , Old French phisonomie , French physiognomie , physiognomonie , from Greek ...; fy`sis nature + ... one who knows or examines, a jud...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/81

physiognomy

facial features and expression, esp. as supposedly indicative of character; the face; apparent characteristics; outward features or appearance.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/f/frankenstein/study-help/full-gloss

physiognomy

facial features.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/w/wuthering-heights/study-help/full-

physiognomy

general appearance of anything, especially the face
Found on http://phrontistery.info/p.html

Physiognomy

Physiognomy is the judging of nature and character of animals and people from external appearances. It is an ancient art, which was remodelled along broadly scientific lines by Charles Dawrwin in his book 'Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals' published in 1873. Formerly, criminology, pathology and anthropology all made extensive reliance on p...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GP.HTM

physiognomy

physiognomy, physiognomies, physiognomic 1. The features of someone's face, especially when such features are used as indicators of that person's character or temperament. 2. The use of facial features to judge someone's character or temperament. 3. The character or outward appearance of something, e.g. the physical features of a landscape.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1406/3

physiognomy

The features and expression of the face, and the art of judging character from it. As a theory, physiognomy is ancient but has no established scientific basis. In China, the art of reading character...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

physiognomy

the study of the systematic correspondence of psychological characteristics to facial features or body structure. Because most efforts to specify ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/62

Physiognomy

the topography and other physical characteristics of a landform and its vegetation (Brown and Gibson 1980:568).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21070

Physiognomy

the topography and other physical characteristics of a landform and its vegetation (Brown and Gibson 1983:568).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22030

Physiognomy

the topography and other physical characteristics of a landform and its vegetation (Brown and Gibson 1983568).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22216

physiognomy

Type: Term Pronunciation: fiz′ē-og′nō-mē Definitions: 1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character. 2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=68787
No exact match found