mole

  1. a spy who works against enemy espionage
  2. (Mexican) spicy sauce often containing chocolate
  3. a small congenital pigmented spot on the skin
  4. a protective structure of stone or concrete; extends from shore into the water to prevent a beach from washing away
  5. small velvety-furred burrowing mammal having small eyes and fossorial forefeet
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Mole

• (n.) A spot, mark, or small permanent protuberance on the human body; esp., a spot which is dark-colored, from which commonly issue one or more hairs. • (n.) A mound or massive work formed of masonry or large stones, etc., laid in the sea, often extended either in a right line or an arc of a circle before a port which it serves to defen...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mole/

mole

<dermatology> A benign pigmented skin lesion or nevus. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

mole

(from the article `tunnels and underground excavations`) Since their first success in 1954, moles (mining machines) have been rapidly adopted worldwide. Close copies of the Oahe moles were used for similar ... Sporadic attempts to realize the tunnel engineer`s dream of a mechanical rotary excavator culminated in 1954 at Oahe Dam on the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/109

mole

(mōl) a fleshy mass formed in the uterus by degeneration or abnormal development of a zygote. hydatid mole , hydatidiform mole an abnormal pregnancy characterized by placental abnormality involving swollen chorionic villi, which form a large, grapelike mass ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

mole

(mōl) melanocytic nevus. any of various other pigmented skin lesions. pigmented mole pigmented nevus.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

mole

(mōl) the base SI unit of amount of matter. It is the amount of a substance that contains as many elementary entities (atoms, ions, molecules, or free radicals) as there are atoms in 0.012 kg of carbon 12 (12C), which is Avogadro's number, 6.023 × 1023, of elementary entities.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Mole

(Mexican) Term used for a thick sauce or paste. A spicy rich traditional Mexican sauce that is usually served with poultry. The most common ingredients include nuts, seeds, spices, Mexican chocolate, and chiles. The most famous moles are Mole Poblano and Oaxaca's black mole.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20118

mole

(mol) SI unit for amount of substance, defined as the number of atoms in exactly 12 g of carbon-12. One mole of a molecular compound contains Avogadro's number molecules and has a mass equal to the substance's molecular weight, in grams.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/m.shtml

mole

(mol) The mole is the SI unit for amount of substance. 1 mole of particles is equal to the number of atoms in exactly 12 g of carbon-12. 1 mole of molecules has a mass equal to the molecular weight in grams.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/m.shtml

mole

(mol) The number of grams of a chemical that is equal to its formula weight (atomic weight for an element or molecular weight for a compound).
Found on http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/abio/glossary.mhtml

Mole

(mol) is the basic unit of measurement in chemistry. By definition, in modern chemistry, one mole represents the number of carbon atoms in exactly 12 grams of carbon 12 (C12).
Found on http://www.chemistry-dictionary.com/definition/mole+%28mol%29.php

Mole

(Vegetarian) Rich, dark, smooth, reddish-brown Mexican sauce made with onion, garlic, several types of chilies, ground sesame or pumpkin seeds and Mexican chocolate.
Found on http://v_w_o.tripod.com/GLOSSARY.html

mole

noun small velvety-furred burrowing mammal having small eyes and fossorial forefeet
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

mole

(chemistry) Unit of the amount of a substance. One mole of a substance is the mass that contains the same number of particles (atoms, molecules, ions, or electrons) as there are atoms in 12 grams of the isotope carbon-12. One mole of a substance is 6.022045 × 1023
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0016771.html

mole

(government) Person working subversively within an organization. The term has come to be used broadly for someone who gives out (`leaks`) secret information in the public interest; it originally meant a person who spends several years working for a government department or a comp...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019526.html

mole

(zoology) Small burrowing mammal with typically dark, velvety fur. Moles grow up to 18 cm/7 in long, and have acute senses of hearing, smell, and touch, but poor eyesight. They have short, muscular forelimbs and shovel-like, clawed front feet for burrowing in search of insects, grubs, ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008424.html

Mole

[animal] Moles are small cylindrical mammals adapted to a subterranean lifestyle. They have velvety fur; very small, difficult to see ears and eyes, reduced hindlimbs; and short, powerful forelimbs with large paws positioned for digging. The term `mole` is especially and most properly used for true moles of the Talpidae family in the order ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(animal)

Mole

[architecture] A mole is a massive structure, usually of stone, used as a pier, breakwater, or a causeway between places separated by water. The word comes from Middle French mole, ultimately from Latin mōlēs, meaning a large mass, especially of rock, and it has the same root as molecule. A mole may have a wooden structure built on top of...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(architecture)

Mole

[espionage] In espionage jargon, a mole (also called a penetration agent, deep cover agent, or sleeper agent) is a long-term spy (espionage agent) who is recruited before he has access to secret intelligence, and subsequently works his way into the target organization. However it is popularly used to mean any long-term clandestine spy or in...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(espionage)

Mole

[unit] The mole is widely used in chemistry instead of units of mass or volume as a convenient way to express amounts of reactants or of products of chemical reactions. For example, the chemical equation 2 H2 + O2 → 2 H2O implies that 2 mol of dihydrogen (H2) and 1 mol of dioxygen (O2) react to form 2 mol of water (H2O). The mole may also...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(unit)

Mole

[Zdeněk Miler character] The Mole (in the Czech original called Krtek, or, for little mole, Krteček; Slovak Krtko) is an animated character in a series of cartoons, created by Czech animator Zdeněk Miler in 1956. Since its inception, the character won itself an enormous popularity in many Central European countries, as well as India, Chi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(Zdeněk_Miler_character)

Mole

Mole noun [ Anglo-Saxon māl ; akin to Old High German meil , Goth. mail Confer Mail a spot.] 1. A spot; a stain; a mark which discolors or disfigures. [ Obsolete] Piers Plowman. 2. A spot, mark, or small permanent protuberance on the human bo...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/88

Mole

Mole noun [ Middle English molle , either shortened from moldwerp , or from the root of English mold soil: confer Dutch mol , OD. molworp . See Moldwarp .] 1. (Zoology) Any insectivore of the family Talpidæ . They have minute eyes and ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/89

Mole

Mole transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Moled ; present participle & verbal noun Moling .] 1. To form holes in, as a mole; to burrow; to excavate; as, to mole the earth. 2. To clear of molehills. [ Prov...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/89
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