Madrigal

A short love poem which can easily be set to music.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

madrigal

[n] - an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voices 2. [v] - sing madrigals
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=madrigal

Madrigal

Renaissance secular work originating in Italy for voices, with or without instruments.
Found on http://www.cbso.co.uk/?page=concerts/glossary.html

Madrigal

Mad'ri·gal (măd'rĭ*g a l) noun [ Italian madrigale , OIt. madriale , mandriale (cf. Late Latin matriale ); of uncertain origin, possibly from It mandra flock, Latin mandra stall, herd of cattle, Greek ma`ndra fold, stable; hence...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/5

madrigal

1. A little amorous poem, sometimes called a pastoral poem, containing some tender and delicate, though simple, thought. 'Whose artful strains have oft delayed The huddling brook to hear his madrigal.' (Milton) ... 2. An unaccompanied polyphonic song, in four, five, or more parts, set to secular words, but full of counterpoint and imitation, and ad...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

madrigal

noun an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voices; follows a strict poetic form
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Madrigal

• (n.) A little amorous poem, sometimes called a pastoral poem, containing some tender and delicate, though simple, thought. • (n.) An unaccompanied polyphonic song, in four, five, or more parts, set to secular words, but full of counterpoint and imitation, and adhering to the old church modes. Unlike the freer glee, it is best sung with ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/madrigal/

madrigal

form of vocal chamber music that originated in northern Italy during the 14th century, declined and all but disappeared in the 15th, flourished anew ... [13 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/8

Madrigal

Madrigal is a term often used in a loose sense for any light song, but properly denoting a type of song of Italian origin which normally consists of two or three tercets, followed by one or more couplets. It is also used for the music written for such songs. Madrigals were either sung by three or more unaccompanied voices, or played upon viols. The...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VM.HTM

Madrigal

[poetry] Madrigal (madrigale) is the name of a form of poetry, the exact nature of which has never been decided in English. The definition given in the New English Dictionary, `a short lyrical poem of amatory character,` offers no distinctive formula; some madrigals are long, and many have nothing whatever to do with love. The most importan...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrigal_(poetry)

madrigal

an Italian short poem or part song suitable for singing by three or more voices, first appearing in England in the anthology Musica Transalpina. There is no fixed rhyme scheme or line length. For example, the anonymous 'My Love in her Attire doth shew her wit.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

madrigal

madrigal, name for two different forms of Italian music, one related to the poetic madrigal in the 14th cent., the other the most common form of secular vocal music in the 16th cent. The poetic madrigal is a lyric consisting of one to four strophes of three lines followed by a two-line strophe calle...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0831088.html

Madrigal

A mad'igal is a short amorous poem, consisting of not less than three or four stanzas or strophes, and containing some tender and delicate, though simple thought, suitably expressed. The madrigal was first cultivated in Italy, and those of Tasso are among the finest specimens of Italian poetry. Several English poets of the time of Elizabeth I and C...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AM.HTM

madrigal

Form of secular song in four or five parts, usually sung without instrumental accompaniment. It originated in 14th-century Italy. Madrigal composers include Andrea Gabrieli, Monteverdi, Thomas Morley, and Orlando Gibbons
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0010632.html

Madrigal

[ensemble] The Ensemble Madrigal (Moscow) is an early music group. It was formed in 1965 by the Russian composer and harpsichord player Andrey Volkonsky to perform Russian and Western sacred music of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Its members were featured soloists of the Moscow State Philharmonic Society. In the intervenin...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrigal_(ensemble)

Madrigal

A madrigal is a secular vocal music composition, usually a partsong, of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras. Traditionally, polyphonic madrigals are unaccompanied; the number of voices varies from two to eight, and most frequently from three to six. It is quite distinct from the Italian Trecento madrigal of the late 13th and 14th centuries, wit...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrigal

Madrigal

[Trecento] The Trecento Madrigal is an Italian musical form of the 14th century. It is quite distinct from the madrigal of the Renaissance and early Baroque, with which it shares only the name. The madrigal of the Trecento flourished ca. 1300 – 1370 with a short revival near 1400. It was a composition for two (or rarely three) voices, som...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrigal_(Trecento)

Madrigal

A contrapuntal song written for at least three voices, usually without accompaniment.
Found on http://www.classicalworks.com/html/glossary.html

madrigal

(1) a 14th-century Italian style of setting secular verse for two or three unaccompanied voices; (2) a 16th/17th-century contrapuntal setting of verse (usually secular) for several equally important voice parts, usually unaccompanied.
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

madrigal

an unaccompanied partsong for several voices
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/52473

Madrigal

A madrigal is an Italian song form, often with Italian text. It is a short work in one movement, sung by a small group of vocalists. Madrigal texts were often set to music using word painting (where the melody would follow the line of the text, e.g. waterfall would have music in the contour of falling water).
Found on http://www.violinonline.com/glossary.htm

madrigal

a composition for unaccompanied voices. It originated in Italy in the fifteenth century, and was written in from two to eight voices.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

Madrigal

Renaissance secular work originating in Italy for voices, with or without instruments, set to a shor
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Madrigal

An italian short poem or part song suitable for singing by three or more voices, first appearing in
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

Madrigal

[music] Longipterygids are a group of specialized early enantiornithe birds from the Early Cretaceous of China. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrigal_(music)
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