interval

  1. a definite length of time marked off by two instants
  2. a set containing all points (or all real numbers) between two given endpoints
  3. the distance between things
  4. the difference in pitch between two notes

Interval

In music an interval is the difference in pitch between any two tones.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VI.HTM

Interval

A set of numbers which consists of those numbers that are greater than one fixed number and less than another and may also include one or both end numbers. For example, the interval [1.5, 3) consists of all numbers that are greater than or equal to 1.5 and smaller than 3. Note that the number 3 is excluded from this interval.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20140

Interval

The gap between two notes. They are described by how far apart the notes are on the scale. For example a third is three notes apart on the scale such as in the start of 'A Day In The Life' and 'I Loves You Porgy'.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/soldonsong/glossary/i.shtml

interval

[n] - the difference in pitch between two notes 2. [n] - a set containing all points (or all real numbers) between two given endpoints 3. [n] - the distance between things
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=interval

Interval

The time period between successive renewal efforts
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20553

Interval

The distance between two notes
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

interval

The distance between one number and the next on the scale of a graph
Example:

Found on http://www.hbschool.com/glossary/math2/index6.html

Interval

In'ter·val noun [ Latin intervallum ; inter between + vallum a wall: confer French intervalle . See Wall .] 1. A space between things; a void space intervening between any two objects; as, an interval between two houses or hills. « 'Twixt host...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/85

interval

The space between two objects or parts, the lapse of time between two recurrences or paroxysms. ... Origin: L. Vallum = rampart ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

interval

separation noun the distance between things; `fragile items require separation and cushioning`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

interval

(in´tәr-vәl) the space between two objects or parts; the lapse of time between two events.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Interval

• (n.) Difference in pitch between any two tones. • (n.) A brief space of time between the recurrence of similar conditions or states; as, the interval between paroxysms of pain; intervals of sanity or delirium. • (n.) Space of time between any two points or events; as, the interval between the death of Charles I. of England, and the...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/interval/

interval

in music, the inclusive distance between one tone and another, whether sounded successively (melodic interval) or simultaneously (harmonic interval). ... [13 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/33

interval

(inter- + vallum rampart) the space between two objects or parts; the lapse of time between two recurrences or paroxysms.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio47.html

interval

(inter- + L. vallum rampart) the space between two objects or parts; the lapse of time between two recurrences or paroxysms.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio74.html

interval

interval 1. A space between two objects, points, or units. 2. The amount of time between two specified situations, events, or conditions; an intervening period of time: 'There was an interval of 50 years before we saw our uncle again.' 3. A period of temporary cessation; a pause: 'There were intervals between the blasting sounds of the loud music...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3827/

Interval

The time (in seconds) between elevator departures from the lobby during morning up peak. An interval of 30 seconds means that a car will be leaving the lobby every 30 seconds with a load of passengers. Traditional Elevatoring theory can be used to show that the interval is equal to the calculated round trip time divided by the number of elevators.
Found on http://www.thyssenkruppelevator.com/glossary.html

Interval

The distance between two notes.
Found on http://www.melbay.com/guitarglossary.html

interval

interval, in music, the difference in pitch between two tones. Intervals may be measured acoustically in terms of their vibration numbers. They are more generally named according to the number of steps they contain in the diatonic scale of the piano; e.g., from C to D is a second, C and D being the ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0825372.html

interval

Type: Term Pronunciation: in′tĕr-văl Definitions: 1. A time or space between two periods or objects; a break in continuity.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=45215

interval

In music, the distance or difference in pitch between two notes. It is written in terms of the major or minor scale. To work out the number of the interval, the letter name of both notes is included. For example, C to D is a second, C to E is a third, C to F is a fourth, and so on. A complete description of an interval includes not only its number,...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019030.html

interval

[mathematics] } defined by {math|1=f(x) = 9 − x2} and {math|g : [[interval (mathematics)#Infinite endpoints|[0,+∞)]] → ℝ} defined by {math|1=g(x) = √{{overline|x}}} can be defined on the interval {math|[−3,+3]}. The functions {math|g} and {math|f} are said to commute with each other if {math|1=g ∘ f = f ∘ g}. In gen...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/interval_(mathematics)#Infinite_endpoints|(−

Interval

[mathematics] Real intervals play an important role in the theory of integration, because they are the simplest sets whose `size` or `measure` or `length` is easy to define. The concept of measure can then be extended to more complicated sets of real numbers, leading to the Borel measure and eventually to the Lebesgue measure. Intervals are...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(mathematics)

Interval

[music] In music theory, an interval is the difference between two pitches. An interval may be described as horizontal, linear, or melodic if it refers to successively sounding tones, such as two adjacent pitches in a melody, and vertical or harmonic if it pertains to simultaneously sounding tones, such as in a chord. In Western music, inte...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music)
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