friction

resistance to movement created when two surfaces are in contact. When friction is present, movement between the surfaces produces heat.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

friction

  1. a state of conflict between persons
  2. the resistance encountered when one body is moved in contact with another
  3. effort expended in rubbing one object against another

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friction

(Learning Modules / Geography / Geography of energy) The resistance to motion when once surface moves against another.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Friction

Friction is the force resisting the relative motion of solid surfaces, fluid layers, and material elements sliding against each other. There are several types of friction: When surfaces in contact move relative to each other, the friction between the two surfaces converts kinetic energy into heat. This property can have dramatic consequences, as i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friction

friction

(frik┬┤shәn) the act of rubbing.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

friction

detrition noun effort expended in moving one object over another with pressure
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Friction

Fric'tion noun [ Latin frictio , from fricare , frictum ,to rub: confer French friction . See Fray to rub, arid confer Dentifrice .] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the b...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/76

Friction

A force that tries to slow things down when two things rub against each other.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20442

friction

A resisting force between two surfaces that are sliding against each other. Static friction is the frictional force that opposes any attempt to start a body moving that is a rest. Kinetic friction is the frictional force that tends to slow a body already in motion. The force due to kinetic friction ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/F/friction.html

Friction

Force opposing the free movement of surfaces in relative motion.
Found on http://jot101.com/2015/05/a-z-of-science-fiction-words/

friction

force that resists the sliding or rolling of one solid object over another. Frictional forces, such as the traction needed to walk without slipping, ... [14 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/63

friction

friction 1. The rubbing of one body (or thing) against another; attrition. 2. The resistance which any body meets with in moving over another body. 3. The rubbing of two objects against each other when one or both are moving. 4. In physics, the resistance encountered by an object moving relative to another object with which it is in contact. 5. In ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/856/

Friction

Friction is a force which tends to make moving objects slow down. Friction also prevents objects from slipping over one another - so for example, friction helps keep your backside on a seat and it allows people to stand upright without their feet slipping out from under them. Friction due to fluid flow is called drag
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

friction

Friction is a resisting force between two surfaces rubbing against each other.
Found on http://www.gcse.com/glos.htm

friction

friction, resistance offered to the movement of one body past another body with which it is in contact. In certain situations friction is desired. Without friction the wheels of a locomotive could not “grip” the rails nor could power be transmitted by belts. On the other hand, in the mov...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0819704.html

Friction

In meteorology, it is the turbulent resistance of the earth on the atmosphere. Considered as the res
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Weather/

Friction

In physics, friction is the effect of rubbing, or the resistance which a moving body meets with from the surface on which it moves. Friction arises from the roughness of the surface of the body moved on and that of the moving body. No such thing can be found as perfect smoothness of surface in bodies. In every case there is, to a less or greater ex...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GF.HTM

friction

In physics, the force that opposes the movement of two bodies in contact as they move relative to each other. The coefficient of friction is the ratio of the force required to achieve this relative motion to the force pressing the two bodies together. Two materials with rough surfaces rubbing together will change kinetic energy into heat and sound ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0015999.html

Friction

It is the force that opposes the relative motion of two bodies in contact.
Found on http://www.vidyagyaan.com/general-knowledge/science/glossary-of-physics-ter

Friction

Mechanical resistance to the relative movement of two surfaces. There are two main types of friction; STATIC FRICTION and DYNAMIC FRICTION. Typically static friction is greater than dynamic friction.
Found on http://www.boltscience.com/pages/glossary.htm

Friction

Resistance between one object and another, e.g., a rough surface provides friction for any object moving along it.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20560

Friction

Resistance between the contact surfaces of two bodies in motion.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/f.html

Friction

resistance to motion due to contacting surfaces.
Found on http://www.empiremagnetics.com/glossary/glossary.htm#A

friction

resistance to movement between two objects contacting each other, causes heat.
Found on http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/gear-up/motorcycle-terms-and-glossary

friction

Surface resistance to the relative motion of one body against the rubbing, sliding, rolling, or flowing of another with which it is in contact. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973
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