fermentation

Breakdown of organic substances, especially by microorganisms such as bacteria and yeasts, yielding incompletely oxidized products. Some forms can take place in the absence of oxygen, in which case ATP is generated in reaction pathways in which organic compounds act as both donors and acceptors of electrons. Historically, the production of ethyl alcohol or acetic acid from glucose. Also applied to anaerobic glycolysis as in lactate formation in muscle. ...
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Fermentation

Fermentation can be either aerobic or anaerobic. Aerobic fermentation is composting. Successful anaerobic fermentation occurs when organic compounds in vegetable and animal wastes are broken down by the action of living anaerobic organisms. This is accomplished by the combination of organic wastes with a fermentable carbohydrate source such as sugar. Lactic-acid-forming anaerobic bacteria ferment the carbohydrate source and preserve nutrients. Pathogenic micro organisms, associated with the wastes, are effectively inactivated during the fermentation process. This makes the fermented material safe for application in agriculture. ...
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fermentation

decomposition process of certain organic substance, e.g., starch, in which a chemical change is brought by enzymes, bacteria, or other microorganisms. Often referred to as 'souring.'
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Fermentation

The process of growing a selected organism, usually a bacterium, mould or yeast, on substrate so as to bring about a desired change or to generate products of the cells' metabolism (e.g. ethanol and carbon dioxide from yeast fermentation). The term is also used to describe biochemical conversions and catabolic reactions producing ATP.
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fermentation

Chemical reaction induced by a living agent yeast, bacterium or mold that splits complex organic compounds to simple ones. For example, yeast converts sugar to alcohol and carbon dioxide. In biotechnology, the process of growing microbes to produce chemical or pharmaceutical compounds. Also referred to as classical biotechnology, traceable back 6,000 years. ...
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Fermentation

The process in which an organic substance is converted into another organic substance and carbon dioxide to generate energy by a (micro)organism in the absence of oxygen. 'Fermentation' comes from the latin word for yeast, a kind of single-celled fungus. The most common fermentation reaction is the one by which glucose is converted into ethanol and...
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fermentation

Oxidation of certain organic substances in the absence of molecular oxygen.
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_F.htm

fermentation

A breakdown in organic compounds caused by a leavening agent, such as the effect of yeast on flour.
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fermentation

[n] - a chemical phenomenon in which an organic molecule splits into simpler substances
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Fermentation

Yeasts do a really useful job: they eat up sugar in grape juice and excrete alcohol. This is called fermentation, and without it all wine would be sweet and alcohol-free. Just like grape juice.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20433

fermentation

the process by which yeast turns sugar (malt) into alcohol. One by-product (in the brewing process) is carbon dioxide, which gives many beers their fizz
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Fermentation

Conversion of sugars into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide, through the action of yeast.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20652

Fermentation

The conversion of grape sugars to alcohol by yeast.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20673

fermentation

A class of biochemical reactions that break down complex organic molecules (such as carbohydrates) into simpler materials (such as ethanol, carbon dioxide, and water). Fermentation reactions are catalyzed by enzymes.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/f.shtml

Fermentation

Fer`men·ta'tion noun [ Confer French fermentation .] 1. The process of undergoing an effervescent change, as by the action of yeast; in a wider sense (Physiol. Chem.) , the transformation of an organic substance into new compounds by the action of a ferment, either formed or unorga...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/20

fermentation

<microbiology> The anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, resulting in energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ... The process is used in the production of alcohol, bread, vinegar and other food or industrial products. It differs from respir...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

fermentation

(fur″mәn-ta´shәn) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Fermentation

• (n.) The process of undergoing an effervescent change, as by the action of yeast; in a wider sense (Physiol. Chem.), the transformation of an organic substance into new compounds by the action of a ferment, either formed or unorganized. It differs in kind according to the nature of the ferment which causes it. • (n.) A state of agitatio...
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fermentation

originally, the foaming that occurs during the manufacture of wine and beer, a process at least 10,000 years old. That the frothing results from the ... [35 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/18

fermentation

(L. fermentatio) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, resulting in energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); the process is used in the production of alcohol, bread, vinegar; and other food or industrial products. It differs from respiration.....
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio34.html

fermentation

fermentation 1. The chemical decomposition of a complex substance; especially, a carbohydrate, into simpler chemical products, brought about by the action of enzymes, bacteria, yeasts, or molds, generally in the absence of oxygen. It may be a natural process, or one brought about or enhanced technically to produce a desired end product; for exampl...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/814/

Fermentation

The total conversion of malt sugars to beer, defined here as three parts, adaptation, primary, and secondary.
Found on http://howtobrew.com/book/glossary

Fermentation

Decomposition and breakdown of organic matter by anaerobic means.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/f.html

Fermentation

a chemical breakdown of honey, caused by sugar-tolerant yeast and associated with honey having a high moisture content.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21030

fermentation

The decomposition of carbohydrates by microorganisms in the absence of air. Louis Pasteur first demonstrated that fermentation is a biochemical process, each type being caused by one species. Fermentation is an aspect of bacterial and fungal metabolism, in which glucose and other sugars are oxidiz...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/F/fermentation.html
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