disjunct

refers to a fragmented distribution area with two or more geographically separated ranges.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10134

disjunct

[adj] - (zoology) having deep constrictions separating head, thorax, and abdomen, as in insects 2. [adj] - marked by separation of or from usually contiguous elements 3. [adj] - used of distributions, as of statistical or natural populations 4. [adj] - (music) progressing melodically by intervals larger than a major second
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=disjunct

Disjunct

Dis¬∑junct' (dĭs*jŭnkt') adjective [ Latin disjunctus , past participle of disjungere to disjoin. See Disjoin , and confer Disjoint .] 1. Disjoined; separated. [ R.] 2. (Zoology) Having the head, thorax, and abdomen separated by a deep c...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/86

disjunct

1. Disjoined; separated. ... 2. <zoology> Having the head, thorax, and abdomen separated by a deep constriction. Disjunct tetrachords, tetrachords so disposed to each other that the gravest note of the upper is one note higher than the acutest note of the other. ... Origin: L. Disjunctus, p. P. Of disjungere to disjoin. See Disjoin, and cf. D...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

disjunct

adjective used of distributions, as of statistical or natural populations; `disjunct distribution of king crabs`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Disjunct

• (a.) Disjoined; separated. • (a.) Having the head, thorax, and abdomen separated by a deep constriction.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/disjunct/

disjunct

of a population of a species, widely separated geographically or ecologically from other populations of the same species.
Found on http://www.anbg.gov.au/glossary/webpubl/lichglos.htm

disjunct

when two or more populations of a species are geographically separated
Found on http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/turtleglossary.shtml

Disjunct

separated from the main distribution of the population
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21767

Disjunct

[linguistics] In linguistics, a disjunct is a type of adverbial adjunct that expresses information that is not considered essential to the sentence it appears in, but which is considered to be the speaker`s or writer`s attitude towards, or descriptive statement of, the propositional content of the sentence, `expressing, for example, the spe...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disjunct_(linguistics)

disjunct

an adjective applied to a melodic line which moves by leap (intervals of more than a 2nd) as opposed to conjunct motion (by step)
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary307.php

disjunct

an adjective applied to a melodic line which moves by leap (intervals of more than a 2nd) as opposed to conjunct motion (by step)
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_musical_terminology

disjunct

occurring in widely separated geographic areas, distinctly separate; applies to a discontinuous range in which one or more populations are separated from other potentially interbreeding populations far enough as to preclude gene flow between them.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_botanical_terms

Disjunct

Geographically widely separated (in reference to distribution).
Found on http://www.jacanaent.com/PhotoLib/Glossary.htm

disjunct

an adjective applied to a melodic line which moves by leap (intervals of more than a 2nd) as opposed to conjunct motion (by step)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22287

disjunct

melodic progression dominated by wide skips.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

disjunct

two closely related taxa are widely separated geographically
Found on http://www.kerbtier.de/Pages/Glossar/enGlossar.html

Disjunct

Another name for the quincunx aspect. See quincunx.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Astrology/

Disjunct

Disjointed or disconnected melody with many leaps.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Disjunct

separated from the main distribution of the population
Found on http://www.calflora.net/botanicalnames/botanicalterms.html
No exact match found