Chain

A chain is a series of connected links which are typically made of metal. A chain may consist of two or more links. Chains are usually made in one of two styles, according to their intended use: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain

Chain

• (v. t.) To fasten, bind, or connect with a chain; to fasten or bind securely, as with a chain; as, to chain a bulldog. • (n.) A series of things linked together; or a series of things connected and following each other in succession; as, a chain of mountains; a chain of events or ideas. • (n.) Iron links bolted to the side of a ves...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/chain/

chain

(chān) a collection of objects linked together in linear fashion, or end to end, as the assemblage of atoms or radicals in a chemical compound, or an assemblage of individual bacterial cells.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

chain

(from the article `combinatorics`) A chain of a graph is an alternating sequence of vertices and edges 0, 1, 1, 2, , , beginning and ending with vertices in which each edge is ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/50

chain

(from the article `elastomer`) ...of, a polymeric molecule consists of several thousand chemical repeating units, or monomers, linked together by covalent bonds. The assemblage of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/50

chain

1. In chemistry, a series of atoms held together by one or more covalent bonds. ... 2. In bacteriology, a linear arrangement of living cells that have divided in one plane and remain attached to each other. ... Origin: L. Catena ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

chain

concatenation noun a series of things depending on each other as if linked together; `the chain of command`; `a complicated concatenation of circumstances`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Chain

[algebraic topology] In algebraic topology, a simplicial k-chain is a formal linear combination of k-simplices. ==Integration on chains== Example 2: The boundary of the triangle is a formal sum of its edges with signs arranged to make the traversal of the boundary counterclockwise. A chain is called a cycle when its boundary is zero. A chai...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain_(algebraic_topology)

Chain

[caste] The Chain, sometimes also pronounced as Chai, are cultivating and fishing caste found in eastern Uttar Pradesh in India. They are a sub-group within the larger Kewat communinity of North India. == Origin == The Chai according to some traditions, were a community of Vaishyas, who lost caste, when they took to fishing. Other tradition...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain_(caste)

CHAIN

[industry standard] The CECED Convergence Working Group has defined a new platform, called CHAIN (Ceced Home Appliances Interoperating Network), which defines a protocol for interconnecting different home appliances in a single multibrand system. It allows for control and automation of all basic appliance-related services in a home: e.g., r...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHAIN_(industry_standard)

CHAIN

[programming language] CHAIN was Datapoint`s batch programming language, used in the late 1980s. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHAIN_(programming_language)

Chain

[real estate] A chain, when used in reference to the process of buying or selling a house, is a sequence of linked house purchases, each of which is dependent on the preceding and succeeding purchase. The term is commonly used in the UK. Each member of the chain is a house sale, which depends both upon the buyers receiving the money from se...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain_(real_estate)

Chain

[unit] A chain is a unit of length. It measures 66 feet, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 m). There are 10 chains in a furlong, and 80 chains in one statute mile. An acre is the area of 10 square chains (that is, an area of one chain by one furlong). The chain has been used for several centuries in Britain and in some other cou...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain_(unit)

Chain

Chain noun [ French chaîne , from Latin catena . Confer Catenate .] 1. A series of links or rings, usually of metal, connected, or fitted into one another, used for various purposes, as of support, of restraint, of ornament, of the exertion and transmission of mechanical po...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/51

Chain

Chain transitive verb [ impast participle p. Chained (chānd); present participle & verbal noun Chaining .] 1. To fasten, bind, or connect with a chain; to fasten or bind securely, as with a chain; as, to chain a bulld...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/51

Chain

A chain is an ornament made of links fastened one in the other so as to make a flexible cord It ia used for the attachment of a watch or pendant, or as a necklace. Such chains were used by the Phoenicians as ornaments; and ear-rings, formed partly of fine gold chains, attributed to the 8th century BC, were found among the ruins of Camirus in Rhodes...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AC.HTM

Chain

a distance of 22 yards, 80 chains to a mile.
Found on http://www.scot-rail.co.uk/page/Glossary

Chain

A distance of 66 feet.
Found on https://www.ncforestry.org/teachers/glossary-of-forestry-terms/

Chain

A measure of length equal to 22 yards. or 20.1 metres.
Found on http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/glossary/glossary.php?letter=C

chain

A multi-unit retail operation with stores managed by a headquarters staff. Usually refers to a group of supermarkets under common ownership.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20108

chain

a potential path joining an originating exchange to the destination exchange for a given traffic parcel, generally subject to constraints such as a maximum number of intermediate nodes or a given order of choice NOTE - Network optimisation is possible when more than one chain exists between an originating and a destination node.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=715-07-04

chain

A series of player actions that are all successful. Success must be defined explicitly in game terms. For example, hit targets without missing a shot. Also called streaks.
Found on http://critical-gaming.com/critical-glossary/

Chain

A series of related transactions, all reliant upon each other. Any chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21468

Chain

A stretchable series of elastic o-rings connected together and placed around each bracket to hold the archwire in place and move the teeth.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22244

Chain

A system of interlinking pins, plates and rollers that transmits power from the front cranks to the rear wheel.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary323.php
No exact match found