cantata

[n] - a musical composition for voices and orchestra based on a religious text
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=cantata

Cantata

A work for solo singers, chorus and instrumentalists based on a lyric or dramatic poetic narrative. It generally consists of several movements including recitatives, arias and ensemble pieces.
Found on http://www.cbso.co.uk/?page=concerts/glossary.html

Cantata

A musical piece based on a narrative, usually in choral or solo form.
Found on http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesoundexchange/projects/glossary/glossary.h

Cantata

Can·ta'ta noun [ Italian , from cantare to sing, from Latin cantare intens of canere to sing.] (Mus.) A poem set to music; a musical composition comprising choruses, solos, interludes, etc., arranged in a somewhat dramatic manner; originally, a composition for a singl...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/17

cantata

oratorio noun a musical composition for voices and orchestra based on a religious text
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Cantata

• (n.) A poem set to music; a musical composition comprising choruses, solos, interludes, etc., arranged in a somewhat dramatic manner; originally, a composition for a single noise, consisting of both recitative and melody.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cantata/

cantata

(from Italian cantare, `to sing`), originally, a musical composition intended to be sung, as opposed to a sonata, a composition played ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Cantata

A musical form usually encompassing chorus and soloists or a solo voice and instrument based on a narrative text. The most well-known cantatas are by J. S. Bach who set scriptural texts.
Found on http://www.greensboroopera.org/oft-education.shtml

Cantata

[Stravinsky] The Cantata by Igor Stravinsky is a work for soprano, tenor, female choir, and instrumental ensemble (of two flutes, oboe, cor anglais (doubling second oboe), and cello), and was composed from April 1951 to August 1952. The premiere performance on 11 November 1952 was by the Los Angeles (Chamber) Symphony Society (to whom the w...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantata_(Stravinsky)

Cantata

A cantata is a poem set to music. The term also describes a musical composition comprising choruses, solos, interludes, etc., arranged in a somewhat dramatic manner. It was originally, a composition for a single noise, consisting of both recitative and melody.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VC.HTM

cantata

cantata (kuntä'tu) [Ital.,=sung], composite musical form similar to a short unacted opera or brief oratorio, developed in Italy in the baroque period. The term was first used in 1620 to refer to strophic variations in the voice part over a recurrent melody in the bass accompaniment. Gradual...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0810237.html

Cantata

Cantata is a cultivated variety of potato.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QC.HTM

cantata

In music, a work in three or more movements, using one or more vocal soloists, and sometimes a chorus. It is usually accompanied by an ensemble or small orchestra, and can be sacred or secular. The word comes from the Italian, meaning `sung`, as opposed to sonata (`sounded`, `played`) for instruments. The first printed...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0003373.html

Cantata

A cantata (literally `sung`, derived from the Italian word `cantare`) is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment, typically in several movements, often involving a choir. The meaning of the term changed over time, from the simple single voice madrigal of the early 17th century, to the multi-voice `cantata da camera` and the `...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantata

Cantata

Music written for chorus and orchestra. Most often religious in nature.
Found on http://www.classicalworks.com/html/glossary.html

cantata

term applied to a 17th-18th- century multi-movement non-theatrical and non-liturgical vocal genre; subsequently used to describe large-scale vocal works in the same spirit, generally for soloists, chorus and orchestra; may also be for solo voice and accompaniment.
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

cantata

a work for choirs and soloists with orchestral accompaniment.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

Cantata

Vocal genre for solo singers, chorus and instrumentalists based on a lyric or dramatic poetic narrat
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/
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