ballade

(1) a 14th-15th-century French song form which set poetry to music; (2) an instrumental (usually piano) piece with dramatic narrative qualities.
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

ballade

[n] - a poem consisting of 3 stanzas and an envoy
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=ballade

Ballade

• (n.) A form of French versification, sometimes imitated in English, in which three or four rhymes recur through three stanzas of eight or ten lines each, the stanzas concluding with a refrain, and the whole poem with an envoy.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/ballade/

ballade

noun a poem consisting of 3 stanzas and an envoy
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Ballade

[classical music] A ballade (from French ballade, baˈlad, and German Ballade, baˈlaːdə, both being words for `ballad`), in classical music since the late 18th century, refers to a setting of a literary ballad, a narrative poem, in the musical tradition of the Lied, or to a one-movement instrumental piece with lyrical and dramatic narrat...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballade_(classical_music)

Ballade

[forme fixe] The ballade as a verse form typically consists of three eight-line stanzas, each with a consistent metre and a particular rhyme scheme. The last line in the stanza is a refrain. The stanzas are often followed by a four-line concluding stanza (an envoi) usually addressed to a prince. The rhyme scheme is therefore usually `ababbc...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballade_(forme_fixe)

Ballade

Bal·lade' noun [ See Ballad , noun ] A form of French versification, sometimes imitated in English, in which three or four rhymes recur through three stanzas of eight or ten lines each, the stanzas concluding with a refrain, and the whole poem with an envoy.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/8

Ballade

A French verse form consisting most often of three eight-line stanzas having the same rhyme pattern,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

ballade

a piece of a romantic type, usually in ABA form, combining dramatic and lyrical characteristics.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

Ballade

A poem of French origin consisting of three stanzas of either 7, 8 or 10 lines and ending with a refrain called an envoi. The envoi is usually half as long as the stanza.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

Ballade

A song with verse form, usually with a particular rhyme scheme
Found on http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesoundexchange/projects/glossary/glossary.h

ballade

ballade (buläd') , in literature, verse form developed in France in the 14th and 15th cent. The ballade usually contains three stanzas of eight lines with three rhymes and a four-line envoy (a short, concluding stanza). Also popular was the ten-line stanza with four rhymes and a five-line e...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0805919.html

Ballade

Ballade is a cultivated variety of potato.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QB.HTM

Ballade

French poetic form and chanson type of the Middle Ages and Renaissance with courtly love texts. Also
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Ballade

French poetic form and chanson type with courtly love texts. Also a Romantic genre, especially a lyric piano piece.
Found on http://www.cbso.co.uk/?page=concerts/glossary.html

ballade

In literature, a poetic form developed in France in the later Middle Ages from the ballad, generally consisting of one or more groups of three stanzas of seven or eight lines each, followed by a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

ballade

In literature, a poetic form developed in France in the later Middle Ages from the ballad, generally consisting of one or more groups of three stanzas of seven or eight lines each, followed by a shorter stanza or envoy, the last line being repeated as a chorus. In music, a ballade is an instrumental piece based on a story; a form used in piano ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005534.html

ballade

one of several formes fixes (`fixed forms`) in French lyric poetry and song, cultivated particularly in the 14th and 15th centuries (compare ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/12

ballade

one of the French formes fixe, cultivated in the thirteenth, fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. A strophic piece with an internal structure of a a b X where a capital letter designates a refrain text and lower case designates new text. Ballades could be love songs, but were frequently so-called occasional pieces, with texts designed to fit a parti...
Found on http://people.vanderbilt.edu/~cynthia.cyrus/ORB/orbgloss.htm

ballade

poem with three seven-, eight-, or ten-line stanzas and refrain. Respectively, these have the rhyme schemes and envoys ababbcC bcbC (cf. Chaucer's 'Ballade of Good Counsel'), ababbcbC bcbC (Dorothy Parker's 'Ballade at Thirty-five'), and ababbccdcD ccdccD (cf. Swinburne's 'A Ballad of Fran&cced;ois Villon'). The refrains appear at the end of each s...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Ballade

Poem with three seven-, eight-, or ten-line stanzas and refrain. Respectively, these have the rhyme
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

Ballade

Three stanzas of ababbcbC followed by a refrain of bcbC. The last line of each, indicated by the capital letter, is repeated verbatim.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary299.php
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