Avulsion

Avulsion in general refers to a tearing away. Specifically, it can refer to: ==In medicine== ==In real estate and geology== ==Other uses== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avulsion

avulsion

(ә-vul´shәn) the tearing away of a structure or part either accidentally or surgically.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Avulsion

(1) Rapid EROSION of the shoreland by waves during a storm. (2) A sudden cutting off of land by flood, currents or change in course of a body of water.
Found on http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/swces/products/glossary.htm

Avulsion

(n) Avulsion is the change or alterations of the boundaries or landmarks of a property occurred due to a sudden change in the natural existence of the environment at that place. Eg. Change of direction of river flow,2. Receding of sea due to earthquake etc
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

avulsion

[n] - a forcible tearing or separation of one body part from another
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=avulsion

Avulsion

• (n.) A tearing asunder; a forcible separation. • (n.) A fragment torn off. • (n.) The sudden removal of lands or soil from the estate of one man to that of another by an inundation or a current, or by a sudden change in the course of a river by which a part of the estate of one man is cut off and joined to the estate of another. Th...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/avulsion/

avulsion

noun an abrupt change in the course of a stream that forms the boundary between two parcels of land resulting in the loss of part of the land of one landowner and a consequent increase in the land of another
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=avulsion

Avulsion

[legal term] In real property law, avulsion refers to a sudden loss or addition to land, which results from the action of water. It differs from accretion, which describes a gradual loss or addition to land resulting from the action of water. ==Avulsion and riparian owners== The distinction between avulsion and accretion becomes important w...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avulsion_(legal_term)

Avulsion

[river] In sedimentary geology and fluvial geomorphology, avulsion is the rapid abandonment of a river channel and the formation of a new river channel. Avulsions occur as a result of channel slopes that are much less steep than the slope that the river could travel if it took a new course. ==Deltaic and net-depositional settings== Avulsion...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avulsion_(river)

Avulsion

A·vul'sion noun [ Latin avulsio .] 1. A tearing asunder; a forcible separation. « The avulsion of two polished superficies. Locke. » 2. A fragment torn off. J. Barlow. 3. (Law) The sudden removal of lands or soil from the est...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/154

AVULSION

A pulling or tearing away.
Found on http://www.thehorse.com/Glossary.xhtml?L=A

Avulsion

A tearing (such as of skin) away from underlying tissue.
Found on http://www.gadsbywicks.co.uk/uploaded/3822.pdf

AVULSION

A tearing away
Found on http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/saortho/glossary/glossary.htm

Avulsion

Avulsion: Tearing away. A nerve can be avulsed by an injury, as can part of a bone. Common Misspellings: evulsion
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2409

Avulsion

Change in the border of two properties due to a sudden change in the natural course of a stream or river, such as a flood, when the border is defined by the channel of the waterway. A famous American case is the Mississippi River's change which put Vicksburg on the other side of the river.
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/avulsion-term.html

Avulsion

Pulling off
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20605

avulsion

pulling off usually of a ligament or fragment of bone.
Found on http://orthopaedics.org.uk/service/glossary/

avulsion

Separation of tooth from its socket due to trauma. See evulsion.
Found on http://www.ada.org/glossaryforprofessionals.aspx

Avulsion

Soft tissue injury where a flap of tissue has been removed or is barely attached. Avulsion also may
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Health/First_Aid/

Avulsion

Tearing away or forcible separation.
Found on http://www.cat-world.com.au/glossary

avulsion

Tearing away. A nerve can be avulsed by an injury, as can part of a bone. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Avulsion

The sudden tearing away of land, as by earthquake, flood, volcanic action or the sudden change in th
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Business/Real_Estate/

Avulsion

The tearing away, forcibly, of a part or structure.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20906

avulsion

Type: Term Pronunciation: ă-vŭl′shŭn Definitions: 1. A tearing away or forcible separation.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=8893

Avulsion

Where, by the immediate and manifest power of a river or stream, the soil is taken suddenly from one man's estate and carried to another. In such case the property belongs to the first owner. An acquiescence on his part, however, will in time entitle the owner of the land to which it is attached to claim it as his own. Avulsion differs from alluvio...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/a185.htm
No exact match found