Waste

High-level waste (HLW) is highly radioactive material arising from nuclear fission. It can be recovered from reprocessing spent fuel, though some countries regard spent fuel itself as HLW. It requires very careful handling, storage and disposal. Low-level waste (LLW)is mildly radioactive material usually disposed of by incineration and burial.

waste

(Learning Modules / Geography / Urban sustainability) Unwanted byproducts of production and consumption.

Waste

Waste is American slang for to kill, to thoroughly beat up.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZW.HTM

Waste

Waste and wastes are terms for unwanted materials. Examples include municipal solid waste (household trash/refuse), hazardous waste, wastewater (such as sewage, which contains bodily wastes, or surface runoff), radioactive waste, and others. The term is often subjective (because waste to one person is not necessarily waste to another) and sometime...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste

Waste

A term for planned spoilage.
Found on http://www.printusa.com/glos.htm

Waste

1. Unwanted materials left over from a manufacturing process. 2. Refuse from places of human or animal habitation.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Waste

Unwanted materials remaining from manufacturing processes, or refuse from humans and animals.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20096

waste

[n] - any materials unused and rejected as worthless or unwanted 2. [n] - (law) reduction in the value of an estate caused by act or neglect 3. [n] - useless or profitless activity 4. [v] - spend thoughtlessly 5. [v] - get rid of 6. [v] - run off as waste 7. [v] - use inefficiently or inappropriately 8. [v] - caus...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=waste

Waste

Waste is what is thrown away because it is no longer needed or wanted. When something is thrown away the natural resources, energy and the time used to make the product are lost. The vast majority of these resources cannot be replaced. By throwing the product away pressure is put on the environment to cope with the waste itself and by a demand for ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20468

Waste

Any item which would ordinarily be described as waste, which is scrap material or discarded or being dealt with as if it were waste effluent or other unwanted surplus material, or something required to be disposed of as broken, worn out, contaminated or otherwise spoiled.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Waste

this is the same as 'rubbish'. It is a wide-ranging term, which includes most unwanted materials.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20571

Waste

Unusable paper or paper damage during normal make-ready, printing or binding operations, as compared to spoilage.
Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

Waste

is any substance or object that is discarded by the business that was responsible for producing it. Every business produces waste covered by environmental legislation - even if the producer does not consider it to be toxic, harmful or large in quantity
Found on http://www.epaw.co.uk/EPT/glossary.html

waste

Anything that is discarded deliberately or otherwise disposed of on the assumption that it is of no further use to the primary user.
Found on http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/iupacglossary/glossaryw.html

Waste

High-level waste (HLW) is highly radioactive material arising from nuclear fission. It can be what is left over from reprocessing used fuel, though some countries regard spent fuel itself as HLW. It requires very careful handling, storage and disposal. Low-level waste (LLW) is mildly radioactive material usually disposed of by incineration and buri...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20725

Waste

Waste adjective [ Middle English wast , Old French wast , from Latin vastus , influenced by the kindred German word; confer Old High German wuosti , German wüst , Old Saxon w...sti , Dutch woest , Anglo-Saxon wēste . Confer Vast...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/10

Waste

Waste transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Wasted ; present participle & verbal noun Wasting .] [ Middle English wasten , Old French waster , guaster , gaster , French gâter to spoil, Latin ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/10

Waste

Waste intransitive verb 1. To be diminished; to lose bulk, substance, strength, value, or the like, gradually; to be consumed; to dwindle; to grow less. « The time wasteth night and day.» Chaucer. « The barrel of meal shall not waste 1 Kin...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/10

Waste

Waste noun [ Middle English waste ; confer the kindred Anglo-Saxon w...sten , Old High German w...stī , wuostī , German wüste . See Waste , adjective & v. ] 1. The act of wasting, or the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/10

waste

1. Desolate; devastated; stripped; bare; hence, dreary; dismal; gloomy; cheerless. 'The dismal situation waste and wild.' (Milton) 'His heart became appalled as he gazed forward into the waste darkness of futurity.' (Sir W. Scott) ... 2. Lying unused; unproductive; worthless; valueless; refuse; rejected; as, waste land; waste paper. 'But his waste ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

waste

noun useless or profitless activity; using or expending or consuming thoughtlessly or carelessly; `if the effort brings no compensating gain it is a waste`; `mindless dissipation of natural resources`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=waste

waste

noun (law) reduction in the value of an estate caused by act or neglect
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=waste

waste

(wāst) gradual loss, decay, or decrease in bulk. material that is unfit for further use within the organism. to gradually deteriorate.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Waste

• (n.) Material derived by mechanical and chemical erosion from the land, carried by streams to the sea. • (v.) Spoil, destruction, or injury, done to houses, woods, fences, lands, etc., by a tenant for life or for years, to the prejudice of the heir, or of him in reversion or remainder. • (a.) To wear away by degrees; to impair grad...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/waste/

Waste

(from the article `English literature`) ...to stage direction did much to change theatrical production in the period, dissected in The Voysey Inheritance (performed 1905, published 1909) ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/12
No exact match found