weight

Roman weight measures were: weight plural informal name equivelant to modern * talentum - talent (from a Greek weight talanton) 60 librae or 720 unciae or 17,280 scripulae ca. 45 lb. avoirdupois or 20 kg (the Greek weight was said to be ca. 25.4 kg) libra librae pound. The pound was more frequently referred to as pondo, abbreviated to p. The pound …...

weight

1. in mud terminology, refers to the density of a drilling fluid. 2. of a measurement, expresses degree of confidence in result of measurement of a certain quantity compared with result of another measurement of the same quantity.

Weight

The weight of a object is the result of gravity pulling a mass toward earth. When a balance has been calibrated using a known mass then any unknown mass placed upon the scale will have a weight proportional to the known mass. The units gram and kilogram are often used to describe the weight of on object. It is common for mass and weight to be used interchangeably. A weight can also be any mass that is used, for example to put a weight on the scale. ...

weight

The gravitational force exerted on a body.
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

Weight

In a neural network, the strength of a synapse (or connection) between two neurons. Weights may be positive (excitatory) or negative (inhibitory). The thresholds of a neuron are also considered weights, since they undergo adaptation by a learning algorithm.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20090

weight

The measurement of a stroke’s width; or, in general, the heaviness of a character or font. Common names for weights include demibold, light, and bold. Some typeface families have several weights, ranging between ultra-bold and extra-light.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20184

weight

[n] - (statistics) a coefficient assigned to elements of a frequency distribution in order to represent their relative importance 2. [n] - an oppressive feeling of heavy force 3. [n] - the relative importance granted to something 4. [n] - the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity 5. [n] - equipment used in c...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=weight

Weight

The 'heaviness' of an object, the amount of attraction between two or more masses. Weight is often measured in Kilogrammes but the proper (SI) unit of weight is the Newton. Weight is not the same as mass which is a measure of how much matter or inertia an object has. Weight on the other hand is dependant on two or more masses and is a measure of th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20448

Weight

Weight is a force. The SI unit of force is the newton - not the kilogram!
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Weight

this refers to the density of the characters within a typeface - e.g. bold, light, extra, demibold, extrabold, etc.
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Weight

The support force needed to maintain an object at rest relative to a reference system. For inertial systems, the weight is sometimes taken to be the force of attraction of the Earth for an object. See also: Mass.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/w/e/weight/source.html

weight

Weight is a measure of the pull of gravitational force on an object. It is directly proportional to mass.
Found on http://www.ktf-split.hr/periodni/en/abc/v.html

weight

The force of gravity on a mass. It is given by the equation, weight = mass × gravity where, on Earth, gravity = 9.8 N/kg. (Do not confuse weight with mass*.)
Found on http://www.gcse.com/glos.htm

Weight

The relative mass of a body or the relative reaction on a body caused by some attractive force such as gravity.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

weight

The gravitational force exerted on a mass
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

Weight

Weight noun [ Middle English weght , wight , Anglo-Saxon gewiht ; akin to Dutch gewigt , German gewicht , Icelandic vætt , Swedish vigt , Danish vægt . See Weigh , transitive verb ] 1. The quality of ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/22

Weight

Weight transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Weighted ; present participle & verbal noun Weighting .] 1. To load with a weight or weights; to load down; to make heavy; to attach weights to; as, to weight a horse or ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/22

Weight

Weight transitive verb (Dyeing) To load (fabrics) as with barite, to increase the weight, etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/22

weight

1. The quality of being heavy; that property of bodies by which they tend toward the center of the earth; the effect of gravitative force, especially when expressed in certain units or standards, as pounds, grams, etc. ... Weight differs from gravity in being the effect of gravity, or the downward pressure of a body under the influence of gravity; ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

weight

noun an artifact that is heavy
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

weight

noun the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

weight

noun an oppressive feeling of heavy force; `bowed down by the weight of responsibility`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

weight

exercising weight noun sports equipment used in calisthenic exercises and weightlifting; it is not attached to anything and is raised and lowered by use of the hands and arms
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

weight

noun (statistics) a coefficient assigned to elements of a frequency distribution in order to represent their relative importance
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

weight

(wt) (wāt) heaviness; the degree to which a body is drawn toward the earth by gravity. in statistics, the process of assigning greater importance to some observations than to others, or a mathematical factor used to apply such a process.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001
No exact match found