weight

Roman weight measures were: weight plural informal name equivelant to modern * talentum - talent (from a Greek weight talanton) 60 librae or 720 unciae or 17,280 scripulae ca. 45 lb. avoirdupois or 20 kg (the Greek weight was said to be ca. 25.4 kg) libra librae pound. The pound was more frequently referred to as pondo, abbreviated to p. The pound …...

weight

1. in mud terminology, refers to the density of a drilling fluid. 2. of a measurement, expresses degree of confidence in result of measurement of a certain quantity compared with result of another measurement of the same quantity.

Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is usually taken to be the force on the object due to gravity. Its magnitude (a scalar quantity), often denoted by an italic letter W, is the product of the mass m of the object and the magnitude of the local gravitational acceleration g; thus: 1=W = mg. The unit of measurement for weight is that...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weight

Weight

(1) An adjustment made in a survey sample to correct for demographic or geographic imbalances. (2) Number of exposures of an advertisement.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21023

weight

(wt) (wāt) heaviness; the degree to which a body is drawn toward the earth by gravity. in statistics, the process of assigning greater importance to some observations than to others, or a mathematical factor used to apply such a process.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

weight

[n] - (statistics) a coefficient assigned to elements of a frequency distribution in order to represent their relative importance 2. [n] - an oppressive feeling of heavy force 3. [n] - the relative importance granted to something 4. [n] - the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity 5. [n] - equipment used in c...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=weight

Weight

• (v. t.) To load (fabrics) as with barite, to increase the weight, etc. • (v. t.) Hence, pressure; burden; as, the weight of care or business. • (v. t.) To assign a weight to; to express by a number the probable accuracy of, as an observation. See Weight of observations, under Weight. • (v. t.) A scale, or graduated standard, o...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/weight/

weight

exercising weight noun sports equipment used in calisthenic exercises and weightlifting; it is not attached to anything and is raised and lowered by use of the hands and arms
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

weight

noun an artifact that is heavy
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=weight

Weight

[representation theory] In the mathematical field of representation theory, a weight of an algebra A over a field F is an algebra homomorphism from A to F, or equivalently, a one-dimensional representation of A over F. It is the algebra analogue of a multiplicative character of a group. The importance of the concept, however, stems from its...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weight_(representation_theory)

Weight

Weight noun [ Middle English weght , wight , Anglo-Saxon gewiht ; akin to Dutch gewigt , German gewicht , Icelandic vætt , Swedish vigt , Danish vægt . See Weigh , transitive verb ] 1. The quality of ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/22

Weight

Weight transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Weighted ; present participle & verbal noun Weighting .] 1. To load with a weight or weights; to load down; to make heavy; to attach weights to; as, to weight a horse or ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/22

weight

1. The quality of being heavy; that property of bodies by which they tend toward the center of the earth; the effect of gravitative force, especially when expressed in certain units or standards, as pounds, grams, etc. ... Weight differs from gravity in being the effect of gravity, or the downward pressure of a body under the influence of gravity; ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Weight

A method of measuring the relative density of paper stock.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21134

Weight

A single style or iteration of a typeface. Sometimes, the term "weight" is refers specifically to the heaviness of a typeface. However, it is often used as a general term for any style: Italic, Small Caps, Bold, Light Expert, etc. See Styles, Weights, Widths - It's All in the (Type) Family on The FontFeed.
Found on http://www.fontshop.com/glossary/

Weight

among the field of dance, weight is one of the main factors that make up the shape of movement (together with space, body and time). These categories were first introduced in modern dance theoretical foundations by Rudolph Laban at the beginning of the XXth century, and have been spread world wide as working tools, both for creative and technical p...
Found on http://www.contemporary-dance.org/dance-terms.html

Weight

Either Gross Weight, Net Weight, or Tare Weight.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosw.htm

Weight

Force applied on an object because of gravity.
Found on http://planetfacts.org/space-terms/

Weight

Fracturing and lowering of the roof strata at the face as a result of mining operations, as in 'taking weight'.
Found on http://www.coaleducation.org/glossary.htm

weight

Gravitational force exerted on an object by another object. The weight of an object depends on its mass – the amount of material in it – and the strength of the local gravitational pull (the acceleration due to gravity). The Earth's gravitational pull decreases with height and consequently, an object weighs less at the top of a mounta...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0025370.html

weight

gravitational force of attraction on an object, caused by the presence of a massive second object, such as the Earth or Moon. Weight is a ... [10 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/20

Weight

In a neural network, the strength of a synapse (or connection) between two neurons. Weights may be positive (excitatory) or negative (inhibitory). The thresholds of a neuron are also considered weights, since they undergo adaptation by a learning algorithm.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20090

Weight

See Basis weight (of paper).
Found on http://www.e-printing.co.uk/glossary.htm

weight

similar to ;body;, the thicker or richer a wine feels in the mouth, the more weight is described as having.
Found on http://www.vinology.com/dictionary/

Weight

The 'heaviness' of an object, the amount of attraction between two or more masses. Weight is often measured in Kilogrammes but the proper (SI) unit of weight is the Newton. Weight is not the same as mass which is a measure of how much matter or inertia an object has. Weight on the other hand is dependant on two or more masses and is a measure of th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20448
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