starch

Storage carbohydrate of plants, consisting of amylose (a linear a (1-4)-glucan) and amylopectin (an a (1-4)-glucan with a (1-6)-branch points). Present as starch grains in plastids, especially in amyloplasts and chloroplasts.

starch

a complex carbohydrate sometimes added to drilling fluids to reduce filtration loss.

Starch

Complex carbohydrates found for example in potatoes, corn, rice and wheat.

Starch

A polysaccharide consisting of glucose units; the principal food storage substance of plants.

Starch

Complex carbohydrate; starch is manufactured and stored in food.
Found on http://gardeningwithconfidence.com/blog/2013/03/21/garden-glossary/

starch

a complex polymer of glucose, used by plants and green algae to store surplus sugar for later use.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_3.html

Starch

Starch is the main source of food energy for most of the world's human population. It can be considered to be a condensation polymer of glucose, like cellulose, although the ether linkages in starch are different to those in cellulose. Starch may be highly branched (amylopectin) or relatively unbranched (amylose).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20046

starch

[n] - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice 2. [v] - stiffen with starch
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=starch

starch

another name for carbohydrate, one of the three main nutrients in food.
Found on http://www.diabetes.co.uk/glossary/s.html

starch

A polysaccharide used by plants to stockpile glucose molecules. The most common forms are amylose and amylopectin.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/s.shtml

Starch

Starch (stärch) adjective [ Anglo-Saxon stearc stark, strong, rough. See Stark .] Stiff; precise; rigid. [ R.] Killingbeck.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/185

Starch

Starch noun [ From starch stiff, confer German stärke , from stark strong.] 1. (Chemistry) A widely diffused vegetable substance found especially in seeds, bulbs, and tubers, and extracted (as from potatoes, corn, rice, etc.) as a white, glistening, granular or powde...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/185

Starch

Starch transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Starched ; present participle & verbal noun Starching .] To stiffen with starch.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/185

starch

<biochemistry> Storage carbohydrate of plants, consisting of amylose (a linear _(1-4) glucan) and amylopectin (an _(1-4) glucan with _(1-6) branch points). Present as starch grains in plastids, especially in amyloplasts and chloroplasts. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

starch

amylum noun a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper...
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=starch

starch

(stahrch) any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula, (C6H10O5)n ; it is the chief storage form of carbohydrates in plants. granular material separated from mature corn (Zea mays), wheat, or potatoes; used as a dusting powder and pharmaceutic aid.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Starch

• (a.) Stiff; precise; rigid. • (n.) Fig.: A stiff, formal manner; formality. • (v. t.) To stiffen with starch. • (n.) A widely diffused vegetable substance found especially in seeds, bulbs, and tubers, and extracted (as from potatoes, corn, rice, etc.) as a white, glistening, granular or powdery substance, without taste or smel...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/starch/

starch

a white, granular, organic chemical that is produced by all green plants. Starch is a soft, white, tasteless powder that is insoluble in cold water, ... [14 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/154

Starch

Starch is American boxing slang for knockout or floor.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZSD.HTM

Starch

Complex carbohydrate composed of thousands of glucose units. Main compound that plants use to store their food energy.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/s.html

starch

A carbohydrate, built up from simple sugars, which is the main energy storage compound in green plants. Starch is a combination of two types of molecules, amylose (normally 20-30%) and amylopectin (normally 70-80%). Both consist of polymers of alpha-D-glucose units in the 4C&l...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/S/starch.html

starch

starch, white, odorless, tasteless, carbohydrate powder. It plays a vital role in the biochemistry of both plants and animals and has important commercial uses. In green plants starch is produced by photosynthesis; it is one of the chief forms in which plants store food. It is stored most abundantly...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0846526.html

Starch

Starch is a carbohydrate stored in plants. It is a white powder comprised of a large numbers of glucose molecules combined which appear as ovoid granules. When heated in water the granules swell enormously, and at the temperature of boiling water are ruptured forming a gelatinous paste.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GS.HTM

starch

Type: Term Pronunciation: starch Definitions: 1. A high molecular weight polysaccharide made up of d-glucose residues consisting of 20% amylose and 80% amylopectin. amylose contains α-1,4 linkages, differing from cellulose in the presence of α- rather than β-glucoside linkages, and amylopectin contains additional α-1,6 linkages;...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=84646

starch

Widely distributed, high-molecular-mass carbohydrate, produced by plants as a food store; main dietary sources are cereals, legumes, and tubers, including potatoes. It consists of varying proportions of two glucose polymers (polysaccharides): straight-chain (amylose) and branched (amylopectin) molecules. Purified starch is a whi...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0010166.html
No exact match found