orchestra

  1. instrumentalists including string players
  2. seating on the main floor in a theater

Orchestra

1) The musicians who provide the musical backing to a show. 2) The ground floor seating in an auditorium. Also Stalls.

Orchestra

An orchestra is a large instrumental ensemble that contains sections of string, brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. Other instruments such as the piano and celesta may sometimes be grouped into a fifth section such as a keyboard section or may stand alone, as may the concert harp and electric and electronic instruments. The term orchestra...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchestra

Orchestra

• (n.) The instruments employed by a full band, collectively; as, an orchestra of forty stringed instruments, with proper complement of wind instruments. • (n.) The space in a theater between the stage and the audience; -- originally appropriated by the Greeks to the chorus and its evolutions, afterward by the Romans to persons of distinc...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/orchestra/

Orchestra

(1) In modern theaters, the ground-floor area on the first floor where the audience sits to watch th
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

orchestra

(from the article `theatre, Western`) The outdoor setting for performances of Greek drama traditionally comprised three areas: a large circular dancing floor (orchstra in Greek) on which ... ...Lycurgus on the south slope of the Acropolis in about 330 . The centre of the theatre was the original dancing place, a flat, circular space ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/27

orchestra

1. The space in a theater between the stage and the audience; originally appropriated by the Greeks to the chorus and its evolutions, afterward by the Romans to persons of distinction, and by the moderns to a band of instrumental musicians. ... 2. The place in any public hall appropriated to a band of instrumental musicians. ... 3. Loosely: A band ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

orchestra

noun seating on the main floor in a theater
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Orchestra

Or'ches·tra noun [ Latin orchestra , Greek ..., orig., the place for the chorus of dancers, from ... to dance: confer French orchestre .] 1. The space in a theater between the stage and the audience; -- originally appropriated by the Greeks to the chorus and its evolutions, afterwa...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/29

Orchestra

A large group of instrumentalists playing together.
Found on http://www.classicalworks.com/html/glossary.html

orchestra

a large instrumental ensemble. orchestration
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

Orchestra

A performing group of diverse instruments
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Orchestra

in ancient Greek, 'dancing place'; circular dancing area for the chorus in the Greek theater); the area between the skene and the slope where the spectators sat.
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

orchestra

instrumental ensemble of varying size and composition. Although applied to various ensembles found in Western and non-Western music, orchestra in an ... [19 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/27

orchestra

Large group of musicians playing together on different instruments. In Western music, an orchestra is usually based on the bowed, stringed instruments of the violin family, to which is usually added the woodwind, brass, and percussion sections. The number of players per section and the instruments used may vary according to the needs of the compose...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0011468.html

orchestra

Latin, meaning: theater space reserved for the Senate / senators
Found on http://archives.nd.edu/ooo.htm

Orchestra

Originally, an orchestra was a semi-circular space in front of a stage where in Ancient Greek theatre the chorus sang and danced. Today the term applies to a body of instrumental performers and also to the part of the theatre where they are positioned. The orchestra is faced by a conductor in the middle, who stands with his back to the audience, an...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VO.HTM

Orchestra

The group of musicians that accompany a staged presentation. In the Baroque period, an orchestra consisted of strings and pairs of woodwinds, and continuo; from 1760 forward, orchestras grew in size. Romantic period orchestras may include up to 100 players as in the operas of Berlioz, Puccini, Verdi, Puccini, Wagner and Richard Strauss.
Found on http://www.greensboroopera.org/oft-education.shtml

orchestra

[n] - instrumentalists including string players 2. [n] - seating on the main floor in a theater
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=orchestra
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