Lime

In the industry this term is used for either hydrated lime or ground limestone used as a fertiliser.

Lime

Lime is sometimes added to compost piles to increase pH. However, unless you are seeking a high-pH compost it is unlikely you need to add lime. Compost piles become acidic in the initial stages as organic acids are formed. However, as the composting process continues, the pH returns to a balanced state. If you add lime, an odour may occur because of the formation of ammonia gas. ...

lime

Soft, fine-grained, creamy-white European wood. Lime proved a great success with woodcarvers as it cuts well with or across the grain. The master carver Grinling gibbons and his school used it extensively.

Lime

Calcium is the chief chemical element of lime which is an essential plant food and soil conditioner that is used to neutralize acid soil and to improve the texture of heavy clay soils

Lime

is a general term for the various forms of calcium oxide and/or hydroxide with lesser amounts of magnesium oxide and/or hydroxide. It is sometimes used incorrectly to refer to limestone.

Lime

Lime is Caribbean slang for to sit or stand around on the pavement.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZL.HTM

LIME

[Cable & Wireless] LIME, an acronym for `Landline, Internet, Mobile, Entertainment`, is a communications provider owned by the British based Cable & Wireless Communications PLC operating in Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LIME_(Cable_&_Wireless)

Lime

Used in the form of dolomite or hydrated lime to raise and stabilize soil pH. Calcium carbonate, or garden lime, is a type of soil amendment used to raise soil pH. It comes in different forms; some forms are fast-acting, other takes months to shift pH some types are pelletized, others are fine and dusty; read product labels to buy the right type fo...
Found on http://beebetter.info/2016/07/garden-glossary/

Lime

Used in the form of dolomite or hydrated lime to raise and stabilize soil ph.
Found on http://gardeningwithconfidence.com/blog/2013/03/21/garden-glossary/

lime

a substance produced from natural limestone that's applied to or worked into lawn and garden soils to restore pH balance in acidic soil. Lime increases alkalinity so that nutrients are more available to plants. See also: acidic, alkaline, amendment, soil pH.
Found on https://www.pennington.com/all-products/fertilizer/resources/glossary-terms

Lime

Soil amendment used to reduce acidity. Lime (calcium carbonate) is applied in powdered or pelletized form.
Found on https://www.lowes.com/projects/lawn-and-garden/garden-glossary/project

Lime

(Citrus) These plants are native to the southern and southeastern mainland of Asia and the bordering Malayan islands. They are small, spiny shrubs or trees with alternate, usually evergreen, leaves, which are shiny and leathery and dotted with oil glands. The stems are mostly winged and jointed with the leaves and there is usually a spine on th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10004

lime

[n] - any of various related trees bearing limes 2. [n] - the green acidic fruit of any of various lime trees 3. [v] - cover with lime, as of lawns, to induce growth
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=lime

Lime

Generally ground limestone which is used to neutralize soil acidity. Essential for crop growth and application rates average 5000kg/ha.
Found on http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/glossary/glossary.php?letter=L

lime

any of a family of chemicals consisting essentially of calcium hydroxide made from limestone (calcite) which is composed mostly of calcium carbonate or a mixture of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/986-Lime

Lime

A white or gray substance, also often known as quicklime. It is obtained by burning limestone or shells to drive of the carbon dioxide. It becomes very hot when mixed with water, creating 'slaked lime'.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Lime

Lime (līm) noun [ See Leam a string.] A thong by which a dog is led; a leash. Halliwell.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/43

Lime

Lime noun [ Formerly line , for earlier lind . See Linden .] (Botany) The linden tree. See Linden .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/43

Lime

Lime transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Limed (līmd); present participle & verbal noun Liming .] [ Confer Anglo-Saxon gelīman to glue or join together. See Lime a viscous substance.] 1. To s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/43

lime

1. To smear with a viscous substance, as birdlime. 'These twigs, in time, will come to be limed.' (L'Estrange) ... 2. To entangle; to insnare. 'We had limed ourselves With open eyes, and we must take the chance.' (Tennyson) ... 3. To treat with lime, or oxide or hydrate of calcium; to manure with lime; as, to lime hides for removing the hair; to li...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

lime

noun the green acidic fruit of any of various lime trees
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

lime

noun any of various related trees bearing limes
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

lime

(līm) calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline and caustic earth, CaO; having various industrial uses and also a pharmaceutic necessity. the acid fruit of Citrus aurantifolia, which contains ascorbic acid.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Lime

• (v. t.) To cement. • (n.) Oxide of calcium; the white or gray, caustic substance, usually called quicklime, obtained by calcining limestone or shells, the heat driving off carbon dioxide and leaving lime. It develops great heat when treated with water, forming slacked lime, and is an essential ingredient of cement, plastering, mortar, e...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/lime/

lime

(Citrus aurantifolia), tree widely grown in tropical and subtropical areas and its edible acid fruits. The tree seldom grows more than 5 m (16 feet) ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/51
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