Jury

a group of 12 ordinary men and women chosen to decide whether an accused person is guilty or not guilty in a Crown Court trial

Jury

[disambiguation] A jury is a body of persons convened to render a verdict in a legal situation, except in Louisiana, where the Police Jury describes the county government. Jury may also refer to: == See also == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_(disambiguation)

jury

[n] - a committee appointed to judge a competition 2. [n] - a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of law
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=jury

Jury

A body of 12 persons selected randomly from society challenged with the task of determining the guilt or otherwise of persons charged with a crime.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

jury

Body of lay people (usually 12) sworn to decide the facts of a case and reach a verdict in a court of law. Juries, used mainly in English-speaking countries, are implemented primarily in criminal...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Jury

the 4 officials who watch for hits in a dry fencing bout
Found on http://www.hpfc.org.uk/glossary.htm

Jury

Body of jurors sworn to reach a verdict according to the evidence in a Court
Found on http://www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk/infoabout/glossary/legal.htm

Jury

Ju'ry adjective [ Etymol. uncertain.] (Nautical) For temporary use; -- applied to a temporary contrivance. Jury mast , a temporary mast, in place of one that has been carried away, or broken. -- Jury rudder , a rudder constructed for temporary use.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/J/17

Jury

Ju'ry noun ; plural Juries . [ Old French jurée an assize, from jurer to swear, Latin jurare , jurari ; akin to jus , juris , right, law. See Just , adjective , and confer Jurat , Abjure .] ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/J/17

jury

noun a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of law
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=jury

Jury

• (a.) A body of men, usually twelve, selected according to law, impaneled and sworn to inquire into and try any matter of fact, and to render their true verdict according to the evidence legally adduced. See Grand jury under Grand, and Inquest. • (a.) A committee for determining relative merit or awarding prizes at an exhibition or compe...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/jury/

jury

historic legal institution in which a group of laypersons participate in deciding cases brought to trial. Its exact characteristics and powers depend ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/j/30

jury

jury, body convened to make decisions of fact in legal proceedings.Sections in this article:IntroductionDevelopment of the Modern JuryThe Modern JuryBibliography
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0826802.html

Jury

Persons selected according to law and sworn to inquire into and declare a verdict on matters of fact.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/j026.htm

Jury

They are refered to the group of randomly selected citizens who has been shortlisted to hear the case in the court in their own area.They jointly determine the case and makes a decision based on the facts and evidences and with the consultation with the judge regarding the rules of law.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

jury

n. one of the remarkable innovations of the English common law (from the Angles and Saxons, but also employed in Normandy prior to the Norman Conquest in 1066), it is a group of citizens called to hear a trial of a criminal prosecution or a lawsuit, decide the factual questions of guilt or innocence or determine the prevailing party (winner) in a l...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1076

jury

Body of lay people (usually 12) sworn to decide the facts of a case and reach a verdict in a court of law. Juries, used mainly in English-speaking countries, are implemented primarily in criminal cases, but also sometimes in civil cases; for example, inquests and libel trials. The British jury derived from Germanic custom. It was introduced...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008833.html

Jury

The group of Rules experts who decide the outcome of protests.
Found on http://www.sailing.org/olympics/basics/sailing-glossary.php

Jury

A body of citizens, normally twelve people, who are sworn in by the judge and asked to give a verdict on a case in a court of law.
Found on http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/glossary

Jury

Competent body to judge felonies in the first instance and on appeal. It is made up of three magistrates and nine jury members in the first instance and twelve jury members on appeal. The jury members are randomly drawn from the electoral rolls.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21732

Jury

A jury system dates back to 5th Century BCE Ancient Greece, where members of the Boule, or Council (and other institutions, such as judicial courts) were selected from the male citizenry by lot. This process had two distinct advantages: Firstly, all citizens were considered, for socio-political purposes to be fundamentally equal, and, secondly, th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury

Jury

The 4 officials, or judges, who watch for hits in a dry fencing bout. The judges watch for hits on the fencer opposite their end of the strip. A judge acknowledges a hit by raising his or her hand, attracting the attention of the referee (or president of the jury). A judge cannot interpret the right-of-way (foil and sabre), only vote on the touches...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_fencing

jury

In a law court, the people who listen to evidence and decide whether an accused person is guilty or not.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/ancient_greeks/arts_and_theatre

jury

A body of people sworn to determine the outcome of a case.
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/politics/legalterms.html

Jury

The officials principally responsible for ensuring that the race is fair and safe for all competitors.
Found on http://sports.specialolympics.org/specialo.org/Special_/English/Coach/Coach
No exact match found