Glass

an inorganic product of fusion which has cooled to a rigid condition without crystallizing.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20089

Glass

A hard, brittle substance, usually transparent, made by fusing silicates under high temperatures with soda, lime, etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Glass

A marine barometer. (Older barometers used mercury-filled glass tubes to measure and indicate barometric pressure.)
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

Glass

A transparent block that breaks very easily. Mostly for aesthetics, but can also offer protection against mobs as there are none that can break blocks yet. Glass is created by smelting sand in a furnace. One block of sand yields one block of glass. If you break glass, you do not get the glass block back.
Found on http://www.minecraftforum.net/topic/175251-minetionary-the-minecraft-dictio

Glass

Glass is an amorphous solid (non-crystalline) material that exhibits a glass transition, which is the reversible transition in amorphous materials (or in amorphous regions within semicrystalline materials) from a hard and relatively brittle state into a molten or rubber-like state. Glasses are typically brittle and can be optically transparent. Th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass

Glass

(from the article `Rayonism`) ...founded by Mikhail F. Larionov, representing one of the first steps toward the development of abstract art in Russia. Larionov exhibited one of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/36

glass

(glas) a hard, brittle, often transparent material, usually consisting of the fused amorphous silicates of potassium or sodium, and of calcium, with silica in excess. a container, usually cylindrical, made from this material. cupping glass a small vessel from which the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

glass

[n] - a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure 2. [n] - the quantity a glass will hold 3. [n] - glassware collectively 4. [n] - a glass container for holding liquids while drinking 5. [v] - furnish with glass, as of a window 6. [v] - scan with binoculars, as for game in the forest 7. [v] - enclose w...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=glass

Glass

• (v. t.) To cover or furnish with glass; to glaze. • (v. t.) Anything made of glass. • (v. t.) To reflect, as in a mirror; to mirror; -- used reflexively. • (v. t.) An optical glass; a lens; a spyglass; -- in the plural, spectacles; as, a pair of glasses; he wears glasses. • (v. t.) A looking-glass; a mirror. • (v. t....
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/glass/

glass

drinking glass noun a container for holding liquids while drinking
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=glass

Glass

Glass (glȧs) noun [ Middle English glas , gles , Anglo-Saxon glæs ; akin to D., G., Dan., & Swedish glas , Icelandic glas , gler , Danish glar ; confer Anglo-Saxon glær amber, Latin glaesum . Confer Glare ,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/31

Glass

Glass transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Glassed ; present participle & verbal noun Glassing .] 1. To reflect, as in a mirror; to mirror; -- used reflexively. « Happy to glass themselves in such a mirror.&...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/31

Glass

1 A state of matter in which a substance displays many properties of a solid but lacks crystal structure. 2 An amorphous igneous rock formed from a rapidly cooling magma.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

glass

1. A hard, brittle, translucent, and commonly transparent substance, white or coloured, having a conchoidal fracture, and made by fusing together sand or silica with lime, potash, soda, or lead oxide. It is used for window panes and mirrors, for articles of table and culinary use, for lenses, and various articles of ornament. ... Glass is variously...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Glass

A fusion of sand and wood ash. Coloured with the addition of metal oxides. Used for the production of beads, and enamels for decoration.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20686

glass

A hard, brittle substance, usually transparent, made by fusing silicates under high temperatures with soda, lime, etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21074

Glass

A marine barometer. (Older barometers used mercury-filled glass tubes to measure and indicate barometric pressure.)
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

glass

A material formed by the rapid cooling of certain molten liquids so that they fail to crystallize but retain an amorphous structure. Glasses are in fact supercooled liquids which, however, have such high viscosity that they behave like solids for all practical purposes. Some glasses may spontaneousl...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/G/glass.html

glass

A non-crystaline rock that results from very rapid cooling of magma.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss2geol.html

glass

A non-crystaline rock that results from very rapid cooling of magma.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

glass

A rock formed when magma is too rapidly cooled (quenched) to allow crystal growth. (see obsidian)
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

Glass

An amorphous (without crystal structure) igneous rock that forms from very rapid cooling of magma. T
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22392

glass

an informal unit of volume used in Australian pubs. In several states of Australia a glass of beer is usually 200 milliliters, but it is 235 milliliters in Queensland and 285 milliliters in Western Australia.
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictG.html

glass

an inorganic material, usually an oxide or a mixture of oxides, produced by melting and subsequently solidifying essentially without crystallization
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=212-05-25

glass

An inorganic solid in which there is no crystalline structure .
Found on http://www.ge-at.iastate.edu/glossary-of-geologic-terms/
No exact match found

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