fillet

1 A small ledge supporting a shelf. 2 A small, narrow band found on architectural features in furniture, such as on a fluted column. 3 A leatherworking wheel tool used in bookbinding to make straight or parallel straight lines. The term can also refer to the line itself.

fillet

  1. a boneless steak cut from the tenderloin of beef
  2. a longitudinal slice or boned side of a fish
  3. a bundle of sensory nerve fibers going to the thalamus
  4. a narrow headband or strip of ribbon worn as a headband
  5. fastener consisting of a narrow strip of welded metal used to join steel members

fillet

A general term used to describe the normally concave surface of the solder at the intersection of the metal surfaces of the solder connection that is formed with a component lead or termination and a PWB land pattern. In particular, it relates to its shape and strengthening function. Visual inspection criteria are largely based on the size and the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

fillet

(fil´et) a loop, as of cord or tape, for making traction during surgery. in the nervous system, a long band of nerve fibers.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

fillet

(from Latin filum, `thread`), in architecture, the characteristically rectangular or square ribbonlike bands that separate moldings and ornaments. ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/25

fillet

[n] - a boneless steak cut from the tenderloin of beef 2. [n] - a longitudinal slice or boned side of a fish 3. [n] - fastener consisting of a narrow strip of welded metal used to join steel members 4. [v] - decorate with a filet 5. [v] - cut into filets, as of fish or meat
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=fillet

Fillet

• (n.) Any scantling smaller than a batten. • (n.) A border of broad or narrow lines of color or gilt. • (n.) The loins of a horse, beginning at the place where the hinder part of the saddle rests. • (n.) A fascia; a band of fibers; applied esp. to certain bands of white matter in the brain. • (n.) A piece of lean meat with...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/fillet/

fillet

fish filet noun a longitudinal slice or boned side of a fish
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=fillet

fillet

filet verb cut into filets; `filet the fish`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=fillet

Fillet

[clothing] A fillet was originally worn in classical antiquity, especially in cultures of the Mediterranean, Levant and Persia, including Hellenic Culture. At that time, a fillet was a very narrow band of cloth, leather or some form of garland, and they were frequently worn by athletes. It was also worn as a sign of royalty and became symbo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fillet_(clothing)

Fillet

[cut] A fillet (or filet) (t, eɪ; from the French word filet /filɛ/) is a cut or slice of boneless meat or fish. == Meat == In the case of beef, in the USA, the term most often refers to beef tenderloin, especially filet mignon. File:Schweinefilet-1.jpg|Fillet of pork File:Kycklingfilé.jpg|Raw chicken fillets === Chicken === Chicken fill...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fillet_(cut)

Fillet

[mechanics] In mechanical engineering, a fillet t is a rounding of an interior or exterior corner of a part design. An interior or exterior corner with an angle or type of bevel, is called a `chamfer`. Fillet geometry, when on an exterior corner is a line of concave function (in these cases, fillets are typically referred to as rounds), whe...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fillet_(mechanics)

Fillet

[picture framing] In the picture framing industry, a fillet (also referred to as a slip) is a small piece of moulding which fits inside a larger frame or, typically, underneath or in between matting, used for decorative purposes. The picture framing term is probably related to, though not necessarily derived from, the engineering term, whic...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fillet_(picture_framing)

Fillet

Fil'let noun [ Middle English filet , felet , from Old French filet thread, fillet of meat, dim. of fil a thread, from Latin filum . See Fille a row.] 1. A little band, especially one intended to encircle the hair of the head. « A belt her wais...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/29

Fillet

Fil'let transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Filleted ; present participle & verbal noun Filleting .] To bind, furnish, or adorn with a fillet.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/29

fillet

1. A little band, especially one intended to encircle the hair of the head. 'A belt her waist, a fillet binds her hair.' (Pope) ... 2. A piece of lean meat without bone; sometimes, a long strip rolled together and tied. ... A fillet of beef is the under side of the sirlom; also called tenderloin. A fillet of veal or mutton is the fleshy part of the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Fillet

A band for the hair.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21746

Fillet

A band of mortar, usually applied to the junction between a roof-covering and a skew. Also known as a 'parged fillet'. Related Words: Mortar; Parging; Skew, skewput
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

fillet

A boned, trimmed, lean piece of fish.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20108

Fillet

A boneless piece of meat or fish. Also spelled filet (French).
Found on http://southernfood.about.com/library/info/bld_f.htm

Fillet

A concave corner piece used on foundry patterns, a radius joint replacing sharp inside corners.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22067

Fillet

A curved surface connecting two surfaces that form an angle.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/f/i/fillet/source.html

Fillet

A fairing at the junction of two surfaces to improve the airflow and so cut down drag. A fillet is often seen at the trailing-edge wing root.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Fillet

A fillet was a band worn as a head-dress in ancient times.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/PF.HTM

Fillet

A joint formed when one plate is joined to another at right angles to form a 'T'. This type of joint is most widely used in arc welding.
Found on http://www.bocindustrial.co.uk/bocindustrial/technical/glossary/f.html
No exact match found