energy

(Learning Modules / Geography / Geography of energy) The capacity to do work.

energy

the quantity that has to be minimized for a mechanical system to be in equilibrium; alternatively: a property of the dynamics of a mechanical system

energy

(Humans as organisms) released in respiration and required for virtually all metabolic activities in living things

Energy

A force or inherent power which is part of all living things, seen and unseen, usually raised by a Witch.

Energy

[event] == History == Hosted by Music journalist Arnold Meyer, fifa event organiser Hans-Jürg Rufener and record label owner Thomas Bischofberger, Energy began as a party after the first Street Parade in 1992 in what was an industrial warehouse. Originally, Energy attracted more visitors than the Street Parade itself until 1994, when the p...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(event)

Energy

The capacity to do work or transfer heat.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10003

Energy

Ability to do work. Most evident in glacial systems as radiant energy from the sun and as latent energy required to melt ice to water.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20131

energy

[n] - a healthy capacity for vigorous activity 2. [n] - (physics) the capacity of a physical system to do work 3. [n] - an exertion of force 4. [n] - enterprising or ambitious drive 5. [n] - an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=energy

Energy

Something that is needed to make things happen.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20442

Energy

A measurement of the work done on a specimen during a test. The energy expended between any two points in a test is measured as the area under the stress/strain curve.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20539

Energy

Energy can neither be created nor destroyed. In metabolism, energy in chemical compounds is trapped eventually in ATP, and then either used in synthetic reactions e.g. protein synthesis in growth, or in the sliding filament mechanism in contracting muscle fibres etc.; ultimately all energy is lost as heat.
Found on http://www.felpress.co.uk/Exercise_Physiology_Glossary.24.0.html

Energy

is the measure of the ability to do work
Found on http://www.epaw.co.uk/EPT/glossary.html

Energy

Energy is defined as the capacity of a body for doing work. The SI unit of energy is the joule. 1 joule is the work done by a force of 1 newton moving a distance of 1 metre in the direction of the force.Conversions1 calorie=4.1868 joules1 kilowatt hour=3.6x106 J1 therm (EEC)=105.506x106 J1 therm (US)=105.4804x106 J1...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/e/n/energy/source.html

Energy

The capacity to do work or transfer heat.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20728

energy

Compare with heat and work. Energy is an abstract property associated with the capacity to do work.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/e.shtml

energy

Energy (E, U) is the characteristic of a system that enables it to do work. Like work itself, it is measured in joules (J). The internal energy of a body is the sum of the potential energy and the kinetic energy of its component atoms and molecules. Potential energy is the energy stored in a body or system as a consequence of its position, shape, ...
Found on http://www.ktf-split.hr/periodni/en/abc/e.html

Energy

The ability to do work and transfer heat.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/649-Energy

Energy

Ability to do work.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/720-Energy

energy

Ability to do work.
Found on http://www.shodor.org/UNChem/glossary.html

energy

Energy enables something to do physical work involving the application of a force.
Found on http://www.gcse.com/glos.htm

energy

The capacity to do work. Work is done by transferring energy from one form to another. For example the chemical energy in a fuel is converted to thermal energy as it burns. See also Laws of Thermodynamics.
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

energy

there are several different forms of energy, including, thermal energy (heat), mechanical energy or electromagnetic energy (radiation). Energy is given in different units, for example as watt-hours (Wh), kilowatt-hours (kWh) or joules (J). One joule is one watt-second (Ws). 1kWh= 1000Wh = 3,600,000 J (=3.6 MJ).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20842

Energy

The capacity for doing work. Forms of energy include: thermal, mechanical, electrical and chemical. Energy may be transformed from one form into another.
Found on http://www.neo.ne.gov/statshtml/glossarye.htm

Energy

En'er·gy noun ; plural Energies . [ French énergie , Late Latin energia , from Greek ..., from ... active; ... in + ... work. See In , and Work .] 1. Internal or inherent power; capacity of acting, operating, or producing an effect, whether exerted ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/40

energy

<radiobiology> Typically defined as the ability to do work. Power is the rate at which work is done, or the rate at which energy is changed. Work characterises the degree to which the properties of a substance are transformed. Energy exists in many forms, which can be converted from one to another in various ways. ... Examples include: gravit...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973
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