Energy

A force or inherent power which is part of all living things, seen and unseen, usually raised by a Witch.

energy

  1. an exertion of force
  2. enterprising or ambitious drive
  3. an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing)
  4. a healthy capacity for vigorous activity

energy

(Learning Modules / Geography / Geography of energy) The capacity to do work.

Energy

Ability to do work. Most evident in glacial systems as radiant energy from the sun and as latent energy required to melt ice to water.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20131

Energy

In physics, energy is a property of objects, transferable among them via fundamental interactions, which can be converted in form but not created or destroyed. The joule is the SI unit of energy, based on the amount transferred to an object by the mechanical work of moving it 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Work and heat are two categories of...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy

energy

(en´әr-je) power that may be translated into motion, overcoming resistance or causing a physical change; the ability to do work. Energy is found in several different forms; it may be thermal (in the form of heat), electric (see electricity), mechanical, chemical, radiant, or kinetic. In doing work, the energy is changed...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Energy

(Gr. energos, at work) The power by which things act to change other things. Potentiality in the physical. Employed by Aristotle as a synonym for actuality or reality. (a) In physics: the capacity for performing work. In modern physics, the equivalent of mass. (b) In i axiology: value at the physical level- -- J.K.F.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/e.html

energy

[n] - a healthy capacity for vigorous activity 2. [n] - (physics) the capacity of a physical system to do work 3. [n] - an exertion of force 4. [n] - enterprising or ambitious drive 5. [n] - an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=energy

Energy

• (n.) Power efficiently and forcibly exerted; vigorous or effectual operation; as, the energy of a magistrate. • (n.) Capacity for performing work. • (n.) Internal or inherent power; capacity of acting, operating, or producing an effect, whether exerted or not; as, men possessing energies may suffer them to lie inactive. • (n.)...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/energy/

energy

<radiobiology> Typically defined as the ability to do work. Power is the rate at which work is done, or the rate at which energy is changed. Work characterises the degree to which the properties of a substance are transformed. Energy exists in many forms, which can be converted from one to another in various ways. ... Examples include: gravit...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

energy

• A measure of the ability to do work – for example, to lift a body against gravity or drag it against friction or to accelerate an object. • An intrinsic property of everything in the universe, including radiation, matter (see mass-energy relationship), and, strangely enough, eve...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/E/energy.html

energy

get-up-and-go noun enterprising or ambitious drive; `Europeans often laugh at American energy`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=energy

energy

vigor 2 vigour 2 zip noun forceful exertion; `he plays tennis with great energy`; `he`s full of zip`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=energy

energy

(biology) In biology, the basis for conducting living processes. Much of life involves energy transfer. Energy is transferred from the surroundings of an organism into its body, and is also transferred within an organism's body. Energy is used by organisms to do things, such as growing or ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0097299.html

energy

(E) Type: Term Pronunciation: en′ĕr-jē Definitions: 1. The exertion of power; the capacity to do work, taking the forms of kinetic energy, potential energy, chemical energy, electrical energy, etc. Synonyms: dynamic force
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=29258

Energy

[esotericism] The term energy is used by writers and practitioners of various esoteric forms of spirituality and alternative medicine to refer to a variety of phenomena. ==History== Various distinct cultural and religious traditions postulate the existence of esoteric energies. Some spiritual practices, such as Qigong or traditional yoga, a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(esotericism)

Energy

[event] == History == Hosted by Music journalist Arnold Meyer, fifa event organiser Hans-Jürg Rufener and record label owner Thomas Bischofberger, Energy began as a party after the first Street Parade in 1992 in what was an industrial warehouse. Originally, Energy attracted more visitors than the Street Parade itself until 1994, when the p...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(event)

Energy

[Keri Hilson song] `Energy` is the debut single by American recording artist Keri Hilson. The song was written and produced by The Runaways, consisting of Louis Biancaniello, Sam Watters, Rico Love, and Wayne Wilkins, for her studio album In a Perfect World… (2009). The track was released as the first single from the singer`s debut in the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(Keri_Hilson_song)

Energy

[psychological] Mental energy or psychic energy is the pseudoscience concept that there is a principle of activity behind the operation of the mind or psyche. ==Philosophical accounts== The idea harks back to Aristotle`s conception of actus et potentia. `Energy` here used in the literal meaning of `activity` or `operation`. Henry More, in h...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(psychological)

Energy

[signal processing] ==Parseval`s theorem== As a consequence of Parseval`s theorem, one can prove that the signal energy is always equal to the summation across all frequency components of the signal`s spectral energy density. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(signal_processing)

Energy

[Signals] Musical notation in Robert Crowley`s 1549 Psalter. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_(Signals)

Energy

En'er·gy noun ; plural Energies . [ French énergie , Late Latin energia , from Greek ..., from ... active; ... in + ... work. See In , and Work .] 1. Internal or inherent power; capacity of acting, operating, or producing an effect, whether exerted ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/40

Energy

a measure of being able to do mechanical work
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary303.php

Energy

A measurement of the work done on a specimen during a test. The energy expended between any two points in a test is measured as the area under the stress/strain curve.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20539

energy

A nutrient essential for maintenance, growth, production and reproduction. Energy is required in larger amounts than any other nutrient except water, and is often the limiting factor in livestock production.
Found on http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/glossary/glossary.asp
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