diamond

Considered the most valuable precious stone. Diamond is the hardest known naturally occurring substance, and refracts (bends) light and disperses colour very strongly. These qualities give the stones great brilliance and fire especially since the 17thC when diamond cutting was developed and improved. The value of a diamond depends on size, colour a …...

diamond

  1. very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem
  2. the area of a baseball field that is enclosed by 3 bases and home plate
  3. the baseball playing field

diamond

A crystalline form of carbon, made of a network of covalent, tetrahedrally bound carbon atoms.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/d.shtml

Diamond

In mineralogy, diamond (d; from the ancient Greek ἀδάμας – adámas `unbreakable`) is a metastable allotrope of carbon, where the carbon atoms are arranged in a variation of the face-centered cubic crystal structure called a diamond lattice. Diamond is less stable than graphite, but the conversion rate from diamond to graphite is negligi.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond

diamond

[n] - very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem 2. [n] - a transparent piece of diamond that has been cut and polished and is valued as a precious gem 3. [n] - a playing card in the minor suit of diamonds
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=diamond

Diamond

• (n.) One of a suit of playing cards, stamped with the figure of a diamond. • (n.) The smallest kind of type in English printing, except that called brilliant, which is seldom seen. • (n.) A geometrical figure, consisting of four equal straight lines, and having two of the interior angles acute and two obtuse; a rhombus; a lozenge. ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/diamond/

diamond

adamant noun very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Diamond

[dog] Diamond was, according to legend, Sir Isaac Newton`s favorite dog, which, by upsetting a candle, set fire to manuscripts containing his notes on experiments conducted over the course of twenty years. According to one account, Newton is said to have exclaimed: `O Diamond, Diamond, thou little knowest the mischief thou hast done.` The s...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_(dog)

Diamond

[gemstone] The hardness of diamond and its high dispersion of light – giving the diamond its characteristic `fire` – make it useful for industrial applications and desirable as jewelry. Diamonds are such a highly traded commodity that multiple organizations have been created for grading and certifying them based on the four Cs, which ar...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_(gemstone)

Diamond

[given name] Diamond is a feminine given name derived from the name of the diamond gemstone. The word is derived from the Greek adamas. The name was the 359th most popular name for baby girls born in the United States in 2007. Deimantė, a Lithuanian variant, was the 10th most popular name for baby girls born in Lithuania in 2007. The boy h...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_(given_name)

Diamond

[grape] The Diamond grape is a white grape which is a cross between the Concord and Iona grapes. It was developed in the 1880s in New York. It is used today in table wines and grape juice. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_(grape)

Diamond

[narrowboat] Diamond was built by John Crichton & Co. of Saltney, Chester for Midland and Coast Canal Carrying Company of Wolverhampton. The boat was built in Chester in 1927 and first registered at Wolverhampton in 1928. She was one of six iron boats in the fleet fitted with two cabins for long distance traffic between the Black Country an...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_(narrowboat)

Diamond

[ship] The Diamond was a three-masted square rigger, built in New York in 1823. She was one of the first ships to operate a regular service for passenger and cargo between Britain and the United States. She sank en route to Liverpool from New York on 2 January 1825 in Cardigan Bay. The alleged wreck site was identified in 2000 and was desig...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_(ship)

Diamond

Di'a·mond adjective Resembling a diamond; made of, or abounding in, diamonds; as, a diamond chain; a diamond field.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/58

Diamond

Di'a·mond noun [ Middle English diamaund , diamaunt , French diamant , corrupted, from Latin adamas , the hardest iron, steel, diamond, Greek .... Perh. the corruption is due to the influence of Greek ... transparent. See Adamant , Tame .] 1. A preci...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/58

diamond

1. A precious stone or gem excelling in brilliancy and beautiful play of prismatic colours, and remarkable for extreme hardness. ... The diamond is native carbon in isometric crystals, often octahedrons with rounded edges. It is usually colourless, but some are yellow, green, blue, and even black. It is the hardest substance known. The diamond as f...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Diamond

A crystalline form of carbon, made of a network of covalent, tetrahedrally bound carbon atoms. In 1797, the English chemist Smithson Tennant proved that diamond is pure carbon.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/i/diamond/source.html

Diamond

A crystalline form of carbon, made of a network of covalent, tetrahedrally bound carbon atoms.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Chemistry/

Diamond

A defensive formation, used when a team is short-handed, in which the four remaining skaters form in
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22383

Diamond

A diamond is a very rare and precious stone used for jewellery and industrial purposes. It is the purest form of carbon and also the hardest substance that can be found in nature. The majority of diamonds are transparent and colourless although there are some varieties of diamonds that have a slight hue.
Found on http://www.studiojewellery.com.au/jewellery-glossary-d.html

diamond

a mineral composed of pure carbon. It is the hardest naturally occurring substance known; it is also the most popular gemstone. Because of their ... [43 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/42

diamond

a mysterious marking on many tape measures in the U.S. The diamonds mark a distance unit equal to exactly 8/5 feet (19.2 inches or 48.768 centimeters). This is potentially useful to carpenters if they wish to place 5 studs, floor joists, etc., in a distance of 8 feet.
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictD.html

diamond

An allotrope, or structural form, of carbon. Diamond is the hardest substance known and the least compressible. It is a better conductor of heat at room temperature than any other material, and when completely pure is transparent. These extreme properties make diamond technologically very useful. It...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/D/diamond.html

Diamond

Carbon
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary071.htm

diamond

Considered the most valuable precious stone. Diamond is the hardest known naturally occurring substance, and refracts (bends) light and disperses colour very strongly.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-d.html
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