Cure

A cure is the end of a medical condition; the substance or procedure that ends the medical condition, such as a medication, a surgical operation, a change in lifestyle, or even a philosophical mindset that helps end a person`s sufferings. It may also refer to the state of being healed, or cured. A remission is a temporary end to the medical signs....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cure

cure

(kūr) the course of treatment of any disease, or of a special case. the successful treatment of a disease or wound. a system of treating diseases. a medicine effective in treating a disease.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

cure

[v] - prepare by chemical processing in order to preserve 2. [v] - provide a cure for, make healthy again
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=cure

Cure

• (v. t.) To set free from (something injurious or blameworthy), as from a bad habit. • (n.) Spiritual charge; care of soul; the office of a parish priest or of a curate; hence, that which is committed to the charge of a parish priest or of a curate; a curacy; as, to resign a cure; to obtain a cure. • (n.) Care, heed, or attention. &...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cure/

cure

verb provide a cure for, make healthy again; `The treatment cured the boy`s acne`; `The quack pretended to heal patients but never managed to`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cure

cure

verb prepare by drying, salting, or chemical processing in order to preserve; `cure meats`; `cure pickles`; `cure hay`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cure

CURE

[magazine] CURE (Cancer Updates, Research, and Education) is a free magazine for cancer patients, survivors, and health care professionals in the oncology field. The publication is the largest consumer magazine in the United States focused entirely on cancer with a circulation of 325,000. The magazine`s topics range from cancer research, ps...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CURE_(magazine)

Cure

[magazine] Cure Magazine is a Japanese rock and fashion magazine. It features the latest visual kei bands as well as fashion and styling tips. It also has the latest news and trends on the visual kei music scene. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cure_(magazine)

Cure

[river] The Cure is a 112 km long river in central France, a right tributary of the Yonne. Its source is in Gien-sur-Cure, in the Morvan hills. Its course crosses the following départements and towns: The Cure flows into the Yonne in Cravant near Vermenton. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cure_(river)

Curé

Cu`ré' (ku`ra') noun [ French, from Late Latin curatus . See Curate .] A curate; a pardon.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/204

Cure

Cure intransitive verb 1. To pay heed; to care; to give attention. [ Obsolete] 2. To restore health; to effect a cure. « Whose smile and frown, like to Achilles' spear, Is able with the change to kill and cure . Shak. » 3. To become healed. «...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/204

Cure

Cure transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Cured (kūrd); present participle & verbal noun Curing .] [ Old French curer to take care, to heal, F., only, to cleanse, Latin curare to take care, to heal, from ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/204

Cure

Cure > (kūr) noun [ OF, cure care, F., also, cure, healing, cure of souls, Latin cura care, medical attendance, cure; perhaps akin to cavere to pay heed, English cution . Cure is not related to care .] 1. Care, heed, or attention. [ Obsolete] &...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/204

Cure

1. To dry inks, varnishes or other coatings after printing to ensure good adhesion and prevent setoff.
Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

cure

1. To heal; to make well. ... 2. A restoration to health. ... 3. A special method or course of treatment. ... See: dental curing. ... Origin: L. Curo, to care for ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Cure

Cancer is said to be cured when there is no sign of the disease and there is no chance of the cancer coming back.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21474

Cure

Cure is slang for an eccentric, odd person.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZCA.HTM

Cure

Cure: 1. To heal, to make well, to restore to good health. Cures are easy to claim and, all too often, difficult to confirm. 2. A time without recurrence of a disease so that the risk of recurrence is small, as in the 5-year cure rate for malignant melanoma. 3. Particularly in the past, a course of treatment. For example, take a cure at a spa. The ...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=31243

Cure

Formation of a final, more stable, usable state following a chemical or physical reaction induced by heat, radiation, etc
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Cure

Maintenance of temperature and humidity for freshly placed concrete during some definite period following placing and finishing to ensure proper hydration of the cement and proper hardening of the concrete.
Found on http://www.pavement.com/glossary/A.html

Cure

Marinating to preserve an ingredient with salt and/or sugar and spices. Preparing gravlax, marinated salmon, is an example of curing.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21216

Cure

Method of maintaining sufficient internal humidity and proper temperature for freshly placed concrete to assure proper hydration of the cement, and proper hardening of the concrete.
Found on http://www.moxie-intl.com/glossary.htm

Cure

To allow a candle to set, or age, to help enhance the fragrance.
Found on http://www.lonestarcandlesupply.com/candle-making/resources/glossary-of-ter

Cure

To change the physical properties of a material irreversibly by chemical reaction via heat and/or catalysts, with or without pressure.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

Cure

To change the properties of an adhesive by chemical reaction or heat alone or in combination with or without pressure.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829
No exact match found