charity

(from the article `Christianity`) ...major perspectives, which have historically overlapped and sometimes coexisted in mutuality or contradiction. The first perspective, both ... ...should act as `responsible` public institutions, holding power in trust for the community. Most companies engage in at least some public-service ....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/57

charity

[n] - a foundation created to promote the public good (not for assistance to any particular individuals) 2. [n] - an institution set up to provide help to the needy 3. [n] - a kindly and lenient attitude toward people 4. [n] - an activity or gift that benefits the public at large
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=charity

Charity

• (n.) Whatever is bestowed gratuitously on the needy or suffering for their relief; alms; any act of kindness. • (n.) Eleemosynary appointments [grants or devises] including relief of the poor or friendless, education, religious culture, and public institutions. • (n.) A charitable institution, or a gift to create and support such a...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/charity/

charity

brotherly love noun a kindly and lenient attitude toward people
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=charity

Charity

[horse] Charity was a racehorse who won the 1841 Grand National at the second attempt, defeating ten rivals in a time of 13 minutes 25 seconds. William Vevers was the official trainer of Charity. The owner of the horse was William Craven, 2nd Earl of Craven. Charity had previously taken part in the 1839 Grand National, falling at the wall, ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_(horse)

Charity

[name] Charity is an English feminine given name derived from the English word charity. It was used by the Puritans as a virtue name. An earlier form of the name, Caritas, was an early Christian name in use by Romans. Charity is also the usual English form of the name of Saint Charity, an early Christian child martyr, who was tortured to de...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_(name)

Charity

[play] Charity is a drama in four acts by W. S. Gilbert that explores the issue of a woman who had lived with a man as his wife without ever having married. The play analyses and critiques the double standard in the Victorian era concerning the treatment of men and women who had sex outside of marriage, anticipating the `problem plays` of S...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_(play)

Charity

[practice] The practice of charity means the voluntary giving of help to those in need. Charity is humanitarian act of temporal principle. ==Etymology== The word `charity` entered the English language through the Old French word `charité` which was derived from the Latin `caritas`. Originally in Latin the word caritas meant preciousness, d...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_(practice)

Charity

[programming language] Charity is an experimental purely functional programming language, developed at the University of Calgary under the supervision of Robin Cockett. Based on ideas by Hagino Tatsuya, it is completely grounded in category theory. Disregarding interactions with the outside world, all Charity programs are guaranteed to term...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_(programming_language)

Charity

[virtue] In Christian theology charity, Latin caritas, is by Thomas Aquinas understood as `the friendship of man for God`, which `unites us to God`. He holds it as `the most excellent of the virtues`. Further, Aquinas holds that `the habit of charity extends not only to the love of God, but also to the love of our neighbor`. Some{who|date=S...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_(virtue)

Charity

Char'i·ty noun ; plural Charities . [ French charité from Latin caritas dearness, high regard, love, from carus dear, costly, loved; asin to Sanskrit kam to wish, love, confer Ir. cara a friend, W. caru to love. Confer Caress .] ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/56

charity

An organisation which raises funds to pass onto people in need, for educational purposes, for the advancement of religion or for the general benefit of the community.
Found on http://www.digita.com/payrollcentral/home/reference/glossary/glossaryc/defa

Charity

An organisation which raises funds to pass onto people in need, for educational purposes, the advancement of religion or for the general benefit of the community.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20949

Charity

An organisation whose aim is to provide help for the needy. Trusts which are registered with the... <a target=_blank href='http://www.finance-glossary.com/terms/charity.htm?id=241&ginPtrCode=00000&PopupMode=false' title='Read full definition of charity'>more</a>
Found on http://www.finance-glossary.com/pages/home.htm

charity

charity (s), charities (pl) 1. An activity or gift that benefits the public at large. 2. Generous actions or donations to aid the poor, ill, or helpless. 3. Benevolent feeling; especially, toward those in need or in disfavor. 4. A kindly and lenient attitude toward all people. 5. An organization which collects money and other voluntary co...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/375/

Charity

Charity is a Latin name for girls. The meaning is `love, fair, blessed` The name Charity is most commonly given to American girls. The name sounds like: Cherita, Cherith, Sharita See also: Faith, Hope, Chasity, Clemence, Esperanza, Sheree, Cherry, Sheri, Sherie, Sherry, Cherilyn, Cheri, Cher, Cherette
Found on https://www.pregnology.com/names/girls/Charity

Charity

For inheritance tax purposes a charity is a UK registered charity or other qualifying body. Other qualifying bodies include organisations such as St John's Ambulance, hospices and orphanages.
Found on www.hmrc.gov.uk/cto/glossary.htm

Charity

HMS Charity was a British C Class destroyer of 1710 tons displacement launched in 1944. HMS Charity was powered by two Admiralty 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 34 knots and carried a crew of 186. She was armed with four 4.5 inch dual-purpose guns; four 40 mm anti-aircraft guns; six 20 mm anti-aircraft guns; four 21-inch torpedo tubes....
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RC.HTM

Charity

In Britain, a charity is defined in law as a business which provides 'a public good' until 2006 there was a presumption that all charities based around education, health or religion were providing a public good, and as such they had no need to prove their public benefit. This allowed private schools to charge enormous fees to the elite children of ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/JC.HTM

charity

in Christian thought, the highest form of love, signifying the reciprocal love between God and man that is made manifest in unselfish love of one`s ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/57

Charity

It refers to generosity towards others in public or for the needy and less fortunate.It is referred to as good deed by an individual for the society. Charity are also the organisation which helps others in need on the humanitarian, educational, scientific and religious grounds. Indirectly they are helping the government in their jobs and for which ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

charity

n. 1) in general the sentiment of benevolence, doing good works, assisting the less fortunate, philanthropy and contributing to the general public. 2) an organization which exists to help those in need or provide educational, scientific, religious and artistic assistance to members of the public. Charities are usually corporations established under...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=179

charity

Originally a Christian term meaning a selfless, disinterested form of love. This developed to include almsgiving or other actions performed by individuals...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

charity

Originally a Christian term meaning a selfless, disinterested form of love. This developed to include almsgiving or other actions performed by individuals to help the poor and needy. Today it refers to any independent agency (for example, Oxfam) that organizes such relief on a regular basis
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0043877.html

Charity

See: charitable organization
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/charity-term.html
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