patronage

  1. the act of providing approval and support
  2. customers collectively
  3. a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient
  4. (politics) granting favors or giving contracts or making appointments to office in return for political support
  5. the business given to a commercial establishment by its customers

Patronage

Patronage is the support, encouragement, privilege, or financial aid that an organization or individual bestows to another. In the history of art, arts patronage refers to the support that kings, popes and the wealthy have provided to artists such as musicians, painters, and sculptors. It can also refer to the right of bestowing offices or church ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patronage

patronage

(from the article `Molière`) ...it was in the form still extant is doubtful. It apparently was a success and secured the favour of the King`s brother Philippe, duc d`Orléans. It ... [13 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/29

patronage

[n] - (politics) granting favors or giving contracts or making appointments to office in return for political support 2. [v] - support by being a patron of
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=patronage

Patronage

• (n.) The right of nomination to political office; also, the offices, contracts, honors, etc., which a public officer may bestow by favor. • (n.) Guardianship, as of a saint; tutelary care. • (v. t.) To act as a patron of; to maintain; to defend. • (n.) Special countenance or support; favor, encouragement, or aid, afforded to a...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/patronage/

Patronage

[transport] In public transport, patronage or ridership is a type of forecasting or statistic for studying the average quantity of passengers (`patrons`) carried per certain time in a mode of public transit system. The concept should not be confused with the maximum loading capacity of one particular vehicle or the whole transit system. The...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patronage_(transport)

Patronage

Pa'tron·age noun [ French patronage . Confer Late Latin patronaticum , and Latin patronatus .] 1. Special countenance or support; favor, encouragement, or aid, afforded to a person or a work; as, the patronage of letters; patronage given to an author. 2...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/34

Patronage

A system of employment for musicians whereby a composer agreed to exclusive employment under the auspices of a patron. Patrons often were wealthy aristocrats or the church.
Found on http://www.violinonline.com/glossary.htm

patronage

patronage 1. The action of a patron in giving influential support, favor, encouragement, or countenance, to a person, institution, work, art, etc. Originally it implied the action of a superior. 2. The appointments or privileges that a politician can give to loyal supporters.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2572/4

patronage

Power to give a favoured appointment to an office or position in politics, business, or the church; or sponsorship of the arts. Patronage was for centuries bestowed mainly by individuals (in Europe...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

patronage

Power to give a favoured appointment to an office or position in politics, business, or the church; or sponsorship of the arts. Patronage was for centuries bestowed mainly by individuals (in Europe often royal or noble) or by the church. In the 20th century, patrons have tended to be political parties, the state, and – in the arts – p...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0018526.html

Patronage

The act of giving financial or political support to an artist. A person who provides financial suppo
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Patronage

The process that was central to political advancement for much of the eighteenth century. In exchange for loyalty from clients, patrons would dispense favours and help clients secure good jobs and political promotion. Patrons might control the elections to parliamentary seats or be able to recommend candidates for other positions within government....
Found on http://www.historyandpolicy.org/glossary
No exact match found