band

The cotton belt that drives the SPINDLE of textile machinery.

Band

A pigmented diagonal or oblique line.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21699

Band

Band is Australian slang for a prostitute.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZB.HTM

band

Type: Term Pronunciation: band Definitions: 1. Any appliance or part of an apparatus that encircles or binds a part of the body. 2. Any ribbon-shaped or cordlike anatomic structure that encircles or binds another structure or that connects two or more parts. 3. A narrow strip containing one or more macromolecules (on occasion, small molecules) dete...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=9360

Band

a thick, pigmented vertical marking that encircles the circumference of the fish's body.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20126

band

[n] - instrumentalists not including string players 2. [n] - a range of frequencies between two limits 3. [n] - a stripe of contrasting color 4. [n] - put around something to hold it together 5. [n] - a strip or stripe of a contrasting color or material 6. [n] - something elongated that is worn around the body or one of t...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=band

Band

A series of very closely spaced, nearly continuous molecular orbitals that belong to the crystal as a whole.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20728

band

1. A set of closely spaced energy levels in an atom, molecule, or metal. 2. A set of closely spaced lines in an absorption spectrum or emission spectrum. 3. A range of frequencies or wavelengths.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/b.shtml

Band

Band (bănd) noun [ Middle English band , bond , Icelandic band ; akin to G., Swedish , & Dutch band , Old High German bant , Goth. bandi , Sanskrit bandha a binding, bandh to bind, for bhanda , bhandh , also to English ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/10

Band

Band intransitive verb To confederate for some common purpose; to unite; to conspire together. « Certain of the Jews banded together. Acts xxiii. 12. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/10

Band

Band transitive verb To bandy; to drive away. [ Obsolete]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/10

Band

Band imperfect of Bind . [ Obsolete] Spenser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/10

band

<genetics> Refers to a narrow portion of a chromosome, which has been darkened by interaction with a dye. Each human chromosome displays a unique pattern of bands and can be identified by its pattern. ... (14 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

band

noun instrumentalists not including string players
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=band

band

stripe noun an adornment consisting of a strip of a contrasting color or material
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=band

band

(band) a strip that holds together or binds separate objects or parts; for anatomical structures, see frenulum, taenia, trabecula, and vinculum. an object or appliance that confines or restricts while allowing a limited degree of movement. an elongated area with parallel or roughly parallel borders...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Band

• (v. t.) A company of persons united in any common design, especially a body of armed men. • imp. of Bind. • (v. t.) A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of color, or of brickwork, etc. • (v. t.) A narrow strip of cloth or other material on any article of dress, to bind, strengthen, orna......
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/band/

band

(from the article `Carboniferous Period`) ...in Great Britain includes the Millstone Grit and the Coal Measures—names in use since the naming of the system. Local names are applied to ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/15

Band

(from the article `Art and Art Exhibitions`) ...and the unnerving Delineator (1974–75). The exhibit culminated with the presentation of three massive pieces that were created in 2006 ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/15

band

(from Middle French bande, `troop`), in music, an ensemble of musicians playing chiefly woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments, in ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/15

band

in cultural anthropology, theoretical type of human social organization consisting of a small number of nuclear families (usually no more than 30 to ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/15

band

band (BAND) 1. Group, company, party, body, troop, crowd, bunch: 'A band of students brought their grievances before the dean.' 2. Orchestra, ensemble, group: 'The band played until midnight.' 3. Unite, join, consolidate, gather: 'If we band together, we can give our complaints greater strength.' 4. Strip, stripe, streak, ring, circlet,...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3535/

Band

The range of acceptable exchange rates between two currencies. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
Found on http://www.equitrend.com/glossary187.xhtml

Band

pattern running around segments perpendicular to the body axis or more or less vertical markings on head.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22033

Band

In architecture the term band describes a continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, such as carved foliage, of colour, or of brickwork, etc. In Gothic architecture, band describes the moulding, or suite of mouldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts, the use of which was most prevalent in the Early English style. Bands of this ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TB.HTM
No exact match found