Tack

• (v. i.) To change the direction of a vessel by shifting the position of the helm and sails; also (as said of a vessel), to have her direction changed through the shifting of the helm and sails. See Tack, v. t., 4. • (v. t.) A contract by which the use of a thing is set, or let, for hire; a lease. • (n.) A peculiar flavor or taint; ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/tack/

tack

(1) The lower forward corner of a fore-and-aft sail. (2) The position of a vessel relative to the trim of its sails or the act of changing from one position or direction to another.
Found on http://reservationsbvi.com/thisoldpirate/glossary.html

tack

(from the article `rigging`) ...for making or shortening sail are known as the running rigging. The running rigging is subdivided into the lifts, jeers, and halyards (haulyards), ... ...was termed `fore-and-aft` sails—that is, those capable of taking the wind on either their front or back surfaces. Such sails are hung alo...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/2

tack

noun (nautical) the act of changing tack
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

tack

noun sailing a zigzag course
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Tack

[sailing] In sailing, tack is a part of a sail, and also an alignment with the wind. Tacking or jibing is the maneuver of turning between starboard and port tack. ==Sail== The tack is the lower corner of the sail`s leading edge. On a sloop rigged sailboat, the mainsail tack is connected to the mast and the boom at the gooseneck. On the same...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tack_(sailing)

Tack

[sewing] In sewing, to tack or baste is to make quick, temporary stitching intended to be removed. Tacking is used in a variety of ways: File:Basted fabric right side.jpg|Basting thread on the right side (outer side) of fabric. File:Basting pattern to material before cutting.jpg |Tracing paper from a pattern is basted to fabric before a pie...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tack_(sewing)

Tack

[square sail] The tack of a square-rigged sail is a line attached to its lower corner. This is in contrast to the more common fore-and-aft sail, whose tack is a part of the sail itself, the corner which is (possibly semi-permanently) secured to the vessel. Most square-rig sails have their clews pulled down to the yard of the sail below, and...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tack_(square_sail)

Tack

Tack intransitive verb (Nautical) To change the direction of a vessel by shifting the position of the helm and sails; also (as said of a vessel), to have her direction changed through the shifting of the helm and sails. See Tack , transitive verb , 4. « Monk, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/3

Tack

Tack noun [ From an old or dialectal form of French tache . See Techy .] 1. A stain; a tache. [ Obsolete] 2. [ Confer Latin tactus .] A peculiar flavor or taint; as, a musty tack . [ Obsolete or Colloq.] Drayton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/3

Tack

Tack transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Tacked ; present participle & verbal noun Tacking .] [ Confer OD. tacken to touch, take, seize, fix, akin to English take . See Tack a small nail.] 1. To fa...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/3

Tack

A tack is a small sharp nail, usually with a large flat head. They are used for fitting a light or thin object to a more solid one, such as carpet to the floor.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GT.HTM

Tack

A temporary stitch to hold pieces together, usually removed after final stitching. Bar tacks are used in buttonholes. Tailor's tacks are discussed below. Tacking is also known as a term for starting off a seam with a few stitches back and forth for stabilizing.
Found on http://www.thesewingdictionary.com/

Tack

All the equipment used on a pony.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20526

Tack

Bridles, saddles, and other equipment used on horses and pack stock.
Found on http://www.americantrails.org/

Tack

Characteristic of ink making it sticky.
Found on http://www.e-printing.co.uk/glossary.htm

Tack

Forward lower corner of a fore-and-aft sail.
Found on http://shipwrightjournal.blogspot.co.uk/p/glossary-of-nautical-terms.html

tack

grazing agreement (R 170)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

tack

grazing agreement (R 170)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Tack

Horse tack is all the gear that comes with owning a horse. The bridle, saddle, bit, girths, cinches, saddle pads, lead ropes, halters, whips, stirrup irons and stirrup leathers, horse boots, and most other horse things are tack.
Found on http://www.horses-and-horse-information.com/horsedictionary.shtml

Tack

Line at the lower corners of a sail. On a fore-and-aft sail, the tack was at the forward lower cringle. On a square sail, the tack led forward and the sheets led aft.
Found on http://shipwrightjournal.blogspot.co.uk/p/glossary-of-nautical-terms.html

Tack

On a triangular sail, the bottom forward corner. Also, to turn the bow of the boat through the wind so the wind exerts pressure on the opposite side of the
Found on http://www.sailinglinks.com/glossary.htm

Tack

Quick adhesion. The property of a pressure-sensitive label which causes it to adhere to a surface instantly with a minimum of pressure and contact time as measured by TLM Tester or equivalent equipment.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Tack

Sail a zig-zag course towards the wind. Also means the lower part of a sail.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20645

Tack

Stickiness of an uncured prepreg.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm
No exact match found