scamp

[v] - perform hastily and carelessly
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=scamp

Scamp

• (n.) A rascal; a swindler; a rogue. • (a.) To perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/scamp/

Scamp

Scamp (skămp) noun [ Old French escamper to run away, to make one's escape. Originally, one who runs away, a fugitive, a vagabond. See Scamper .] A rascal; a swindler; a rogue. De Quincey.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/25

Scamp

Scamp transitive verb [ Confer Scamp , noun , or Scant , adjective , and Skimp .] To perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially. [ Colloq.] « A workman is said to scamp his work when he does...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/25

Scamp

A sketch of a design showing the basic concept.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Scamp

Preliminary concept or layout of an advertisement or other material.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21395

Scamp

Preliminary design or layout of an advertisement or other promotional material. Also a UK pressure group against offensive advertising (S.C.A.M.P. - Stop Crude Advertising Material in Public).
Found on http://www.cim.co.uk/resources/glossary/home.xhtml?letter=m

Scamp

Scamp is slang for to perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZS.HTM

Scamp

See Rough.
Found on http://www.nmoa.org/Library/index.htm

Scamp

The USS Scamp was an American Gato Class submarine of 1525 tons displacement launched in 1942 and lost during the Second World War. The USS Scamp had a top speed of 21 knots surfaced and carried a complement of between 65 and 74. She was armed with one 3 inch dual-purpose gun; two 20 mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft guns; six 21 inch bow torpedo tubes and...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RS.HTM

scamp

To perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially. 'A workman is said to scamp his work when he does it in a superficial, dishonest manner.' (Wedgwood) 'Much of the scamping and dawdling complained of is that of men in establishments of good repute.' (T. Hughes) ... Origin: Cf. Scamp, or Scant, and Skimp. ... Source: Webst...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973
No exact match found