Radiation

Any heated surface loses heat to cooler surrounding space or surfaces through radiation. The earth receives its heat from the sun by radiation. The heat rays are turned into heat as they strike an object which will absorb some or all of the heat transmitted.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Radiation

energy moving in the form of particles or waves. Familiar radiations are heat, light, radio waves, and microwaves. Ionizing radiation is a very high-energy form of electromagnetic radiation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21808

Radiation

In physics, radiation is a process in which electromagnetic waves (EMR) travel through a vacuum or through matter-containing media; the existence of a medium to propagate the waves is not required. A different but related definition says radiation is a subset of these electromagnetic waves combined with a class of energetic subatomic particles wit...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation

radiation

The emission of alpha, beta, or gamma rays.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

radiation

The mechanism for transfer of heat from a solid surface (such as a component) by electromagnetic transmission.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

Radiation

• (n.) The act of radiating, or the state of being radiated; emission and diffusion of rays of light; beamy brightness. • (n.) The shooting forth of anything from a point or surface, like the diverging rays of light; as, the radiation of heat.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/radiation/

radiation

<radiobiology> Propagation of energy through space. In the context of this report, it is electromagnetic radiation (X-rays or gamma rays) or corpuscular radiation (alpha particles, electrons, protons, neutrons) capable of producing ionisation. ... (16 Dec 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Radiation

(1) Transfer of heat through electromagnetic waves from hot to cold. (2) Electromagnetic waves of energy having frequency and wavelength. The shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) are more energetic. The electromagnetic spectrum is comprised of a) cosmic rays, b) gamma rays, c) x-rays, d) ultraviolet rays, e) visible light rays, f) infrared, g) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20747

radiation

(ra″de-a´shәn) a proceeding outward from a common center. a structure made up of parts that go outward from a center, especially a tract of the central nervous system made up of fibers that go out in different directions. energy carried by waves or a stream of particles. Electroma...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Radiation

(Radioactivity) Strictly speaking, radiation means giving off any energy particles or waves and includes heat and light. But usually used to mean radioactivity. This means gamma rays, alpha or beta particles from a radioactive source. The radioactivity comes from the breakdown of atoms. The source can be natural or made in a nuclear reactor. Uncont...
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=r

Radiation

- Energy transmitted from a heat source to the air around it. Radiators actually depend more on convection than radiation.
Found on http://www.homebuildingmanual.com/Glossary.htm

Radiation

1) Emission or transfer of energy in the form of electromagnetic waves. 2) The process by which electromagnetic radiation is propagated through free space by virtue of joint undulatory variations in the electric and magnetic fields in space. This concept is to be distinguished from conduction and convection.
Found on http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/glossary/radiation.html

radiation

1. Transfer of heat between bodies without a change in the temperature of the intervening medium. 2. Any release of energy from its source
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

Radiation

1. Rays of energy. Gamma rays and X-rays are two of the types of energy waves often used in medicine
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22417

radiation

1. the phenomenon by which energy, in the form of waves or particles, emanates from a source into space 2. energy transferred through space in the form of waves or particles NOTE - The associated verb is: 'to radiate'.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=702-02-06

radiation

noun the act of spreading outward from a central source
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Radiation

Ra`di·a'tion (-ā'shŭn) noun [ Latin radiatio : confer French radiation .] 1. The act of radiating, or the state of being radiated; emission and diffusion of rays of light; beamy brightness. 2. The shooting forth of anything from a point or surface, like the ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/3

Radiation

A term to describe waves or particles. Types of radiation include x-rays, gamma rays and electron beams
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20892

Radiation

a variety of types of energy, such as X-rays and ultraviolet
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=R

Radiation

A wave of energy sent across space. Examples include heat and light energy
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22272

Radiation

Electromagnetic waves as it relates to astronomy.
Found on http://planetfacts.org/space-terms/

Radiation

Electromagnetic waves or particles which travel through space carrying energy.
Found on http://www.solarspace.co.uk/Glossary4.php

radiation

emission and propagation of energy through vacuum or matter in the form of electromagnetic waves or particles
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=393-12-01

radiation

Emission of radiant energy as particles or waves – for example, heat, light, alpha particles, and beta particles (see electromagnetic waves and radioactivity). See also atomic radiation. All hot objects radiate heat. Radiated heat does not need a medium through which to travel (it can travel in ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006045.html

radiation

emission or propagation of energy in the form of waves or particles
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=881-02-01
No exact match found