NOiSE

== Plot == This story portrays Susono Musubi, a young police officer in a post-apocalyptic subterranean city that`s thriving with activity, who is investigating recent child abductions. She finds a heavily toned down, sword-like Gravitational Beam Emitter as well as other elements that take different forms in the later publication (for example, S....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NOiSE

Noise

Noise means any unwanted sound. Noise is not necessarily random. Sounds, particularly loud ones, that disturb people or make it difficult to hear wanted sounds, are noise. For example, conversations of other people may be called noise by people not involved in any of them; any unwanted sound such as domesticated dogs barking, neighbours playing lo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise

Noise

• (v. t.) To spread by rumor or report. • (v. t.) To disturb with noise. • (n.) Sound of any kind. • (n.) Music, in general; a concert; also, a company of musicians; a band. • (n.) Loud or continuous talk; general talk or discussion; rumor; report. • (n.) Especially, loud, confused, or senseless sound; clamor; din. &bu...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/noise/

Noise

(Digital cameras and photo printers) A term used in the field of audio engineering to describe interference that can lead to impure sounds and distortion. Noise may occur, for example, as a result of faulty microphones or recording equipment. In digital imaging, noise is a term used to describe the visible effect of interference on the CCD sensor....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20472

noise

(from the article `noise`) in acoustics, any undesired sound, either one that is intrinsically objectionable or one that interferes with other sounds that are being listened ... Noise is anything that interferes with the transmission of a signal. In telephone conversations interference might be caused by static in the line, ... ...ar...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/n/48

noise

(from the article `radar`) The sensitivity of a radar receiver is determined by the unavoidable noise that appears at its input. At microwave radar frequencies, the noise that ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/n/48

noise

(noiz) unwanted variations in a signal that result from imperfections in transmission; see also signal-to-noise ratio. any disturbance in a visual signal being recorded in radiography; see also mottle. quantum noise in radiology, randomness of image or projection measurement...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Noise

1) A random energy that contains energy at all audio frequencies.
2) Any unintentional or objectionable signal added to an audio signal.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

noise

1. Sound of any kind. 'The heavens turn about in a most rapid motion without noise to us perceived.' (Bacon) ... Noise is either a sound of too short a duration to be determined, like the report of a cannon; or else it is a confused mixture of many discordant sounds, like the rolling of thunder or the noise of the waves. Nevertheless, the differenc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

noise

noun electrical or acoustic activity that can disturb communication
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

noise

dissonance noun the auditory experience of sound that lacks musical quality; sound that is a disagreeable auditory experience; `modern music is just noise to me`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

noise

(music) In pop music, a style that relies heavily on feedback, distortion, and dissonance. A loose term that came into use in the 1980s with the slogan `noise annoys`, it has been applied to hardcore punk, grunge, and industrial music, among others
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0033975.html

noise

(physics) Unwanted sound. Permanent, incurable loss of hearing can be caused by prolonged exposure to high noise levels (above 85 decibels). Over 55 decibels on a daily outdoor basis is regarded as an unacceptable level. In scientific and engineering terms, a noise is any random, unpredictable...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007894.html

Noise

[acoustic] Acoustic noise is any sound in the acoustic domain, either deliberate (music, speech, etc.) or unintended. It is important to recognise that the term `noise` is also used to refer to other, non-audible forms, especially in electronics and in the radio/radar spectrum. ==Environmental noise== Environmental noise is the comprehensiv...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(acoustic)

Noise

[audio] Noise in audio, recording, and broadcast systems refers to the residual low level sound (usually hiss and hum) that is heard in quiet periods of a program. In audio engineering it can refer either to the acoustic noise from loudspeakers, or to the unwanted residual electronic noise signal that gives rise to acoustic noise heard as `...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(audio)

Noise

[Big-bang] Author: Halio, `Trafalga Square at Christmas, with Tree`, Jan 2005 ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(Big-bang)

Noise

[company] ==History== Noise was founded with a staff of 10 people on September 2, 1996 for the original purpose of developing games for PCs. A short time after, Noise became a part of Marigul Management, a company created by Nintendo and the Japanese telecommunications company Recruit for the purpose of enlisting smaller developers to make ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(company)

Noise

[economic] Economic noise, or simply noise, describes a theory of pricing developed by Fischer Black. To Black, noise is the opposite of information. Sometimes it`s hype, other times it`s inaccurate ideas, other times it`s inaccurate data; noise has many forms. Noise is everywhere in the economy and we can rarely tell the difference between...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(economic)

Noise

[electronics] In electronics, noise is a random fluctuation in an electrical signal, a characteristic of all electronic circuits. Noise generated by electronic devices varies greatly, as it can be produced by several different effects. Thermal noise is unavoidable at non-zero temperature (see fluctuation-dissipation theorem), while other ty...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(electronics)

Noise

[industrial] little cat face behind the circle of heaven....by hope float organisation ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(industrial)

Noise

[programming block] ==Programs== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(programming_block)

Noise

[radio] In radio reception, noise is the superposition of white noise and other disturbing influences on the signal, caused either by thermal noise and other electronic noise from receiver input circuits or by interference from radiated electromagnetic noise picked up by the receiver`s antenna. If no noise were picked up with radio signals,...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(radio)

Noise

[signal processing] In signal processing, noise is a general term for unwanted (and, in general, unknown) modifications that a signal may suffer during capture, storage, transmission, processing, or conversion. Sometimes the word is also used to mean signals that are random (unpredictable) and carry no useful information; even if they are n...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(signal_processing)

Noise

[video] Noise, in analog video and television, is a random dot pattern of static displayed when no transmission signal is obtained by the antenna receiver of television sets and other display devices. The random pattern superimposed on the picture, visible as a random flicker of `dots` or `snow`, is the result of electronic noise and radiat...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(video)

Noise

Noise intransitive verb To sound; to make a noise. Milton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/N/27
No exact match found