Mixing

To combine or blend into one mass or mixture.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20471

Mixing

Reduction and adjustment/enhancement of larger amount of independent audio signals into a smaller amount.
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Mixing

method of controlling and blending recorded sounds
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

mixing

The mingling or blending of particles or components, especially of different kinds. ... Phenotypic mixing, the condition in which virus particles released from a cell that is infected with two different viruses has components from both the infecting agents. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

mixing

In the context of stochastic processes, events A and B (that is, subsets of possible outcomes of the process) 'are mixing' if they are asymptotically independent in the following way. Let L be a lag operator that moves all time subscripts back by one (e.g. replacing t by t-1). Iff A and B are mixing, then taking the limit as h goes to inf...
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=mixing

Mixing

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Mix
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mixing/

mixing

(from the article `baking`) ...mixed in a large, horizontal dough mixer (see Figure 2), processing about one ton per batch, and usually constructed with heat-exchange jackets, ... The mixing and bulk fermentation (if any) of flat-bread doughs can be performed in conventional equipment and vary only in minor details from the ... The h...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/103

mixing

(from the article `motion-picture technology`) The final combination of tracks onto one composite sound track synchronous with the picture is variously known as mixing, rerecording, or dubbing. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/103

mixing

(from the article `plastic`) The first step in most plastic fabrication procedures is compounding, the mixing together of various raw materials in proportions according to a ... Mixing is carried out on machines similar to those used in mastication, sometimes immediately after softening. Reactive materials, fillers, oils, and ... [2 ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/103

mixing

the intermingling of traffic flowing between concentration and expansion stages, usually through a group selector
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=714-04-11

mixing

the combination of programme signals from different sources with a view to producing the final programme signal
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=723-02-08

mixing

process for combining several signals appearing simultaneously from several sources into a single signal
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=806-12-25

mixing

Type: Term Pronunciation: mik′sing Definitions: 1. The mingling or blending of particles or components, especially of different kinds.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=55595

Mixing

[mathematics] A weak topological mixing is one that has no non-constant continuous (with respect to the topology) eigenfunctions of the shift operator. Topological mixing neither implies, nor is implied by either weak or strong mixing: there are examples of systems that are weak mixing but not topologically mixing, and examples that are top...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixing_(mathematics)

Mixing

[process engineering] In industrial process engineering, mixing is a unit operation that involves manipulation of a heterogeneous physical system with the intent to make it more homogeneous. Familiar examples include pumping of the water in a swimming pool to homogenize the water temperature, and the stirring of pancake batter to eliminate ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixing_(process_engineering)

Mixing

Air movements (usually vertical) that make the properties of the air with a parcel homogeneous. It may result in a lapse rate approaching the moist or dry adiabatic rate.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22268
No exact match found