mood

a term applied to sentences and verbs to signal a wide range of meanings, especially speaker's attitude to the factual content of utterances, e.g. certainty, possibility (e.g. Sam must/may be at home). The distinction between active and passive sentences/verbs is also sometimes considered a mood.
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mood

the controlling atmosphere of a work, which may be tense, uplifting, sad, or a blend of atmospheres.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/american-poets-of-the-20th-century

Mood

• (n.) Manner; style; mode; logical form; musical style; manner of action or being. See Mode which is the preferable form). • (n.) Manner of conceiving and expressing action or being, as positive, possible, hypothetical, etc., without regard to other accidents, such as time, person, number, etc.; as, the indicative mood; the infinitive mo...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mood/

Mood

(1) In literature, a feeling, emotional state, or disposition of mind--especially the predominating
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mood

(from the article `collective behaviour`) ...effects. First, it sensitizes people to one another. In this sense milling focuses people`s attention on the collectivity and on a subject or ... The crucial step in developing crowd behaviour is the formation of a common mood directed toward a recognized object of attention. In a typical rio...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/117

mood

(mldbomacd) a pervasive and sustained emotion that, when extreme, can color one's whole view of life; in psychiatry and psychology the term is generally used to refer to either elation or depression. See also mood disorders. mood-congruent consistent with one's mood, a term used par...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Mood

(Mood (modal / modality)) 'Mood' is an aspect of English verbs. It is created in a verb phrase through the use of a modal auxiliary. This kind of auxiliary verb has the effect of suggesting that the action told of by the verb is not actual but merely potential, e.g. 'He might win' or 'She could go'.…
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mood

noun the prevailing psychological state; `the climate of opinion`; `the national mood had changed radically since the last election`
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mood

noun verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
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mood

(art) In art appreciation, the general atmosphere, or state of mind and feelings, that a work of art generates. For example, the mood of a painting could be disturbing or tranquil, dark or energetic
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mood

(grammar) In grammar, the form a verb takes to indicate the type of action the sentence expresses. The four moods a verb can take in English are indicative, interrogative, subjunctive, and imperative
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Mood

[psychology] A mood is an emotional state. Moods differ from emotions in that they are less specific, less intense, and less likely to be triggered by a particular stimulus or event. Moods generally have either a positive or negative valence. In other words, people typically speak of being in a good mood or a bad mood. Mood also differs fro...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mood_(psychology)

Mood

Mood (mōd) noun [ The same word as mode , perhaps influenced by mood temper. See Mode .] 1. Manner; style; mode; logical form; musical style; manner of action or being. See Mode which is the preferable form). 2. (Gram.) Manner of conceiving an...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/98

Mood

Mood noun [ Middle English mood , mod , Anglo-Saxon mōd mind, feeling, heart, courage; akin to Old Saxon & OFries. mōd , Dutch moed , Old High German muot , German muth , mut , courage, Dan. & Swedish mod , Icelandic m...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/98

mood

a characteristic state of feeling
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

mood

a characteristic state of feeling
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/940757

mood

A division in the verbal area which refers to whether the action of the verb represents a fact, a wish, a possibility, necessity or a command.
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Mood

A pervasive and sustained emotion that colors the perception of the world. Common examples of mood i
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mood

in grammar, a category that reflects the speaker`s view of the ontological character of an event. This character may be, for example, real or unreal, ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/117

mood

in logic, the classification of categorical syllogisms according to the quantity (universal or particular) and quality (affirmative or negative) of ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/117

mood

mood or mode,in verb inflection, the forms of a verb that indicate its manner of doing or being. In English the forms are called indicative (for direct statement or question or to express an uncertain condition, e.g., If they do not send it, we cannot go), imperative (for commands), and subjunctive ...
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mood

Temper of mind; temporary state of the mind in regard to passion or feeling; humor; as, a melancholy mood; a suppliant mood. 'Till at the last aslaked was mood.' (Chaucer) 'Fortune is merry, And in this mood will give us anything.' (Shak) 'The desperate recklessness of her mood.' (Hawthorne) ... Origin: OE. Mood, mod, AS. Modmind, feeling, heart, c...
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Mood

The feeling a combination of colors and design elements convey to the viewer.
Found on http://www.sensationalcolor.com/understanding-color/theory/color-term-gloss

mood

Type: Term Pronunciation: mūd Definitions: 1. The pervasive feeling, tone, and internal emotional state of a person that, when impaired, can markedly influence virtually all aspects of the person's behavior or his or her perception of external events.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=55990

mood

[n] - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
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