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Jargon

Jargon, technical terminology, or term of art, is `the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group.` An industry term is a type of technical terminology that has a particular meaning within a specific industry. The philosopher Étienne Bonnot de Condillac observed in 1782 that `every science requires a special l......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jargon

Jargon

• (v. i.) To utter jargon; to emit confused or unintelligible sounds; to talk unintelligibly, or in a harsh and noisy manner. • (n.) A variety of zircon. See Zircon. • (n.) Confused, unintelligible language; gibberish; hence, an artificial idiom or dialect; cant language; slang.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/jargon/

jargon

(from the article `zircon`) ...clear, transparent red, orange, and yellow varieties. Matura diamond, from Sri Lanka, is clear and colourless, either naturally or made so through ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/j/8

jargon

in colonial history, an unstable rudimentary hybrid language used as a means of communication between persons having no other language in common. ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/j/8

Jargon

- A bunch of technical stuff that sounds important, but the customer really doesn't want to hear.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21026

Jargon

Potentially confusing words and phrases used in an occupation, trade, or field of study. We might sp
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Jargon

See zircon.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Jargon

Jar'gon (jär'gŏn) intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Jargoned (-gŏnd); present participle & verbal noun Jargoning .] To utter jargon; to emit confused or unintelligible sounds; to talk unintelligibly, or in a har...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/J/5

Jargon

Jar'gon noun [ French jargon , Old French also gargon , perhaps akin to English garrulous , or gargle .] Confused, unintelligible language; gibberish; hence, an artificial idiom or dialect; cant language; slang. 'A barbarous jargon .' Macaulay. 'All jargon...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/J/5

jargon

jargon, pejorative term applied to speech or writing that is considered meaningless, unintelligible, or ugly. In one sense the term is applied to the special language of a profession, which may be unnecessarily complicated, e.g., “medical jargon.” Jargon can also mean clumsy language tha...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0826004.html

jargon

Type: Term Pronunciation: jar′gŏn Definitions: 1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=46168

Jargon

Jargon is a vocabulary used by a special group or occupational class, usually only partially understood by outsiders. The special vocabularies of medicine, law, banking, science and technology, education, military affairs, sports, and the entertainment world all fall under the heading of jargon. Examples of occupational jargon include such formal t...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AJ.HTM

Jargon

language used by a particular profession or interest group. May include vocabulary unfamiliar to those outside the group, sometimes deliberately.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

jargon

Language that is complex and hard to understand, usually because it is highly technical or occupational, used in the wrong contexts, or designed to impress or confuse (`technical jargon`; `writing in pseudoscientific jargon`; `using a meaningless jargon`). Jargon can be subcategorized as, for example, ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005987.html

jargon

Technical language that is used by a particular profession or group of people. It is not wrong to use jargon in documentation. For example, if a reference manual is designed for SQL programmers, then it is acceptable to use terms such as 'table', 'entity', '3rd Normal Form' and so on. However, it is not appropriate to use such terms for the average...
Found on http://www.techscribe.co.uk/techw/glossary.htm

jargon

Specialised language concerned with a particular subject, culture or profession. It is not usually found in the everyday speech of ordinary readers or listeners and so should be avoided in the general media if possible.
Found on http://www.thenewsmanual.net/Resources/glossary.html

Jargon

Specialised words associated with a specialist subject.
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Jargon

Zircon
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary077.htm

jargon

[n] - specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=jargon

Jargon

Mode of speech familiar only to a group or profession. For example medical jargon or technical jargon.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary1.html

Jargon

Highly technical language used by specific group.
Found on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_rhetorical_terms

Jargon

the technical language of an occupation or group
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20403

jargon

[SAT terms] technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/151274

jargon

[Lexical terms] technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/558097
No exact match found.