Slang

Slang consists of a lexicon of non-standard words and phrases in a given language. Use of these words and phrases is typically associated with the subversion of a standard variety (such as Standard English) and is likely to be interpreted by listeners as implying particular attitudes on the part of the speaker. In some contexts a speaker`s select....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slang

Slang

words and phrases which are used in informal context, often linked with certain regions or used by people identifying with particular groups. May differentiate that group from others.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Slang

• (n.) Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc. • (n.) Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory. • imp. of Sling. Slung. •......
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/slang/

slang

(Colloquial / slang (colloquialism)) A 'colloquy' is a formal word for 'conversation', so colloquial language means the everyday language or register we adopt when chatting to friends, for example, e.g. 'Hello Fred, how's the new mother-in-law these days?'. Slang is a particular form of colloquial language used by certain social groups, e.g. 'Hey-...
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsn-z.htm

slang

slang term noun informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions; often vituperative or vulgar; `their speech was full of slang expressions`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

slang

cant noun a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); `they don`t speak our lingo`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Slang

Slang imperfect of Sling . Slung. [ Archaic]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/117

Slang

Slang noun Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory. [ Local, Eng.] Holland.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/117

Slang

Slang transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Slanged ; present participle & verbal noun Slanging .] To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language. [ Colloq.] « Every gentleman abused by a cabman or slan...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/117

Slang

a more extreme form of colloquialism of a racy, offensive or abusive nature. e.g.referring to the police as 'pigs'.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20629

Slang

Informal diction or the use of vocabulary considered inconsistent with the preferred formal wording
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

slang

informal language
Found on http://www.eslgold.com/acad_vocab_definitions.html

Slang

informal, non-standard vocabulary
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20403

slang

Level of language which is lower than colloquialism; it is the language of the gutter, the street, the market place. It is also the language of intimacy, of everyday conversation, which may change very rapidly with the years.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

slang

slang, vernacular vocabulary not generally acceptable in formal usage. It is notable for its liveliness, humor, emphasis, brevity, novelty, and exaggeration. Most slang is faddish and ephemeral, but some words are retained for long periods and eventually become part of the standard language (e.g., p...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0845506.html

slang

strip of land (used as a measure of coppice) (L 238)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

slang

strip of land (used as a measure of coppice) (L 238)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Slang

The definition of slang varies from source to source, however the generally accepted definition among the public is of language which is very informal (that is more so than colloquial language which is simply informal) or much below the standard level of education. Hence the dividing line between slang and colloquialisms is very fine, and moving. M...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZSB.HTM

slang

unconventional words or phrases that express either something new or something old in a new way. It is flippant, irreverent, indecorous; it may be ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/107

slang

Very informal language usage that often serves to promote a feeling of group membership. It is not usually acceptable in formal speech or writing and includes expressions that may be impolite or taboo in conventional communication. Forms of slang develop among particular groups (for example soldiers, teenagers, and criminals), and are often extende...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005986.html

slang

[n] - informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions 2. [v] - use slang or vulgar language 3. [v] - abuse with coarse language
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=slang
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