hippus

Intermittent pupillary dilation and constriction, independent of illumination, convergence, or psychic stimuli. ... Origin: G. Hippos, horse, from a fancied suggestion of galloping movements ... Respiratory hippus, dilation of the pupils occurring during forced, voluntary inspiration, and contraction during expiration. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

hippus

(hip┬┤әs) abnormal exaggeration of the rhythmic contraction and dilation of the pupil, independent of changes in illumination or in fixation of the eyes.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

hippus

(from the article `eye, human`) ...to five millimetres (about 0.18 inch). During this steady condition, the pupils do not remain at exactly constant size; there is a characteristic ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/52

hippus

Type: Term Pronunciation: hip′ŭs Definitions: 1. Intermittent pupillary dilation and constriction, independent of illumination, convergence, or psychic stimuli.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=41058

Hippus

Hippus, also known as pupillary athetosis, is spasmodic, rhythmic, but irregular dilating and contracting pupillary movements between the sphincter and dilator muscles. Pupillary hippus comes from the Greek hippos meaning horse, perhaps due to the rhythm of the contractions representing a galloping horse. It is particularly noticeable when pupil f...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippus
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