Boulder

• (n.) Same as Bowlder. • (n.) A mass of any rock, whether rounded or not, that has been transported by natural agencies from its native bed. See Drift. • (n.) A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of water; a large pebble.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/boulder/

boulder

(from the article `harbours and sea works`) A common breakwater design is based on an inner mound of small rocks or rubble, to provide the basic stability, with an outer covering of larger ... Fragments in gravel range in size from pebbles (4–64 mm [0.16–2.52 inches] in diameter), through cobbles (64–256 mm [2.52–10....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/99

Boulder

(from the article `Kalgoorlie`) town, south central Western Australia. Together with neighbouring Boulder to the south, it forms the principal settlement of the East Coolgardie ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/99

boulder

1. A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of water; a large pebble. ... 2. <geology> A mass of any rock, whether rounded or not, that has been transported by natural agencies from its native bed. See Drift. Bowlder clay, the unstratified clay deposit of the Glacial or Drift epoch, often containing large numbers of bowlders. Bowld...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

boulder

bowlder noun a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of origin
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Boulder

Boul'der (bōl'dẽr) noun Same as Bowlder .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/85

Boulder

A boulder is a class of rock more than 256 mm in diameter.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/HB.HTM

Boulder

A large substrate particle that is larger that cobble, >256 mm in diameter.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21804

Boulder

A rock fragment with a diameter of more than 256 mm (about the size of a volleyball). A boulder is one size larger than a cobble.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

Boulder

A rounded rock on a BEACH, greater than 256 mm in diameter, larger than a cobble. See also GRAVEL, shingle.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20127

Boulder

Boulder, city (1990 pop. 83,312), seat of Boulder co., N central Colo.; inc. 1871. A Rocky Mountain resort and a suburb of Denver, it is the seat of the Univ. of Colorado (1876). Industries include aerospace and biological research and the manufacture of machinery; electric, electronic, and computer...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/us/A0808493.html

boulder

boulder, large rock fragment formed by detachment from its parent consolidated rock by weathering and erosion. In engineering and geology, especially in the United States, the term is applied to loose rocks having specific sizes according to various systems of classification, i.e. the Wentworth scal...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0808494.html

Boulder

city, seat (1861) of Boulder county, north-central Colorado, U.S., on Boulder Creek, at the base of the Flatiron Range of the Rocky Mountains, at an ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/99

Boulder

Large fragment of rock that has a diameter greater than 256 millimeters (200 millimeters in the United Kingdom).
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/b.html

boulder

Rock fragments larger than 60.4 cm (24 inches) in diameter.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22040

Boulder

To climb a difficult, but short, rock pitch where a potential fall will be of minimal consequence (shy of a crater).
Found on http://santiamalpineclub.org/mountain/climbing/terms/

Boulder

[n] - a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of origin 2. [n] - a town in north central Colorado
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Boulder
No exact match found