Archaea

Alternative name suggested for the Archaebacteria to emphasise the difference of this sub-kingdom from the Eubacteria.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Archaea

Archaea were initially classified as bacteria, receiving the name archaebacteria (in Kingdom Monera), but this classification is outdated. Archaeal cells have unique properties separating them from the other two domains of life: Bacteria and Eukaryota. The Archaea are further divided into four recognized phyla. Classification is difficult because ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaea

Archaea

(ahr-ke┬┤ә) in the three-domain system of classification, one of the two large divisions into which prokaryotes are grouped. They are genetically distinct from bacteria and share some features with the eukaryotes. They have a variety of shapes and sizes, may or may not have a cell wall, and occur as single cells and as f...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

archaea

A unique group of microorganisms. They are called bacteria (Archaeobacteria) but they are genetically and metabolically different from all other known bacteria. They appear to be living fossils, the survivors of an ancient group of organisms that bridged the gap in evolution between bacteria and the eukaryotes (multicellular organisms). The name Ar...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Archaea

Archaea: A unique group of microorganisms classified as bacteria (Archaeobacteria) but genetically and metabolically different from all other known bacteria. They appear to be living fossils, the survivors of an ancient group of organisms that bridged the gap in evolution between bacteria and the eukaryotes (multicellular organisms). The name Archa...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2322

archaea

archaea: see Archaebacteria.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0912779.html

Archaea

Group of micro-organisms that are without a nucleus and have a single chromosome. They are now known to constitute a separate domain in the tree of life, next to and equally distant from bacteria and eukaryotes. All are strict anaerobes, that is, they are killed by oxygen. This is thought to be a primitive condition and to indicate that Archaea...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007821.html

Archaea

Is a group of recently discovered organisms that resemble bacteria. However, these organisms are biochemically and genetically very different from bacteria. Some species of the domain Archaea live in the most extreme environments found on the Earth.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/a.html

archaea

micro-organisms that belong to a major division of life, as different from bacteria as humans are.
Found on http://www.divediscover.whoi.edu/glossary.html

Archaea

microscopic life forms that are single-celled and prokaryotic. They are divided into two distantly related groups, the Eubacteria (or 'true' bacteria), and the Archaebacteria (or Archaea). The Archaea are the most ancient form of life on Earth, having existed here for at least 3.5 billion years. Both groups make up two of the three domains of livin...
Found on http://www.coml.org/edu/glossary/g1.htm

archaea

Primitive prokaryotes which, until recently, were known as archaebacteria and placed in the same kingdom (Monera) as eubacteria. Largely through the work of Carl Woese and his colleagues at the University of Illinois, they are now generally recognized as being genetically and structurally distinct, ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/A/archaea.html

Archaea

Proposed, but not widely accepted, sixth taxonomic kingdom that would include the archaebacteria.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Biology/

archaea

unicellular organisms that are prokaryotic (that is, do not have a membrane-bound nucleus and other internal units) but that differ in certain ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/95
No exact match found