Amusia

Studies have shown that congenital amusia is a deficit in fine-grained pitch discrimination and that 4% of the population suffers from this disorder. Acquired amusia, on the other hand, may take several forms. Patients with brain damage may experience the loss of ability to produce musical sounds while sparing speech, much like aphasics lose speec...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amusia

amusia

(ә-mu┬┤ze-ә) loss of ability to produce (motor amusia) or to recognize (sensory amusia) musical sounds.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

amusia

A form of aphasia characterised by an inability to produce or recognise music. ... Origin: G. A-priv. + mousa, music ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

amusia

amusia The inability to produce or comprehend music or musical sounds. From Greek amousia (through New Latin), a state of being without the Muses, especially song.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2838/8

Amusia

Amusia: The inability to recognize musical tones or to reproduce them. Amusia can be congenital (present at birth) or be acquired sometime later in life (as from brain damage). Amusia is composed of a- + -musia and literally means the lack of music. Also commonly called tone deafness.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=19458

amusia

Type: Term Pronunciation: ă-mū′zē-ă Definitions: 1. A form of aphasia characterized by an inability to produce or recognize music.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=3133
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