shingle

  1. building material used as siding or roofing
  2. coarse beach gravel of small water-worn stones and pebbles (or a stretch of shore covered with such gravel)
  3. a small signboard outside the office of a lawyer or doctor, e.g.

Shingle

Shingle can refer to a covering element as a roof shingle or wall shingle, including: ==British English== In British English shingle can refer to a mass of small rounded pebbles, especially on a shingle beach. ==Places== ==Technology== ==Culture== ==Other uses== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shingle

Shingle

• (n.) Round, water-worn, and loose gravel and pebbles, or a collection of roundish stones, such as are common on the seashore and elsewhere. • (n.) A sign for an office or a shop; as, to hang out one`s shingle. • (v. t.) To cut, as hair, so that the ends are evenly exposed all over the head, as shingles on a roof. • (v. t.) To ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/shingle/

Shingle

(1) a small unit of prepared roofing material designed for installation with similar units in overlapping rows on inclines normally exceeding 25 percent; (2) to cover with shingles; (3) to apply any sheet material in overlapping rows like shingles.
Found on http://www.rbroof.com/glossary-of-terms

shingle

(from the article `ocean`) ...tide levels. It then acts as a stabilizing factor. Storm waves may drive forward coral fragments derived from `stag-horn` corals growing on the ... Imbricate bedding is a shingle structure in a deposit of flattened or disk-shaped pebbles or cobbles (Figure 3). That is to say, elongated and ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/83

shingle

1. <geology> Round, water-worn, and loose gravel and pebbles, or a collection of roundish stones, such as are common on the seashore and elsewhere. ... 2. <botany> Shingle oak, a kind of oak (Quercus imbricaria) used in the Western States for making shingles. ... Origin: Prob. From Norw. Singl, singling, coarse gravel, small round stone...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

shingle

shake noun building material used as siding or roofing
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Shingle

Shin'gle noun [ Prob. from Norw. singl , singling , coarse gravel, small round stones.] (Geol.) Round, water-worn, and loose gravel and pebbles, or a collection of roundish stones, such as are common on the seashore and elsewhere.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/88

Shingle

Shin'gle transitive verb [ imperfect &. past participle Shingled ; present participle & verbal noun Shingling .] 1. To cover with shingles; as, to shingle a roof. « They shingle their houses with it.» ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/88

Shingle

A loose term for coarse beach material, a mixture of GRAVEL, pebbles and larger material, often well-rounded and of hard rock, e.g. chert, flint etc.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20127

Shingle

A machine sawn wood, usually cedar, roofing and siding product. See 'Shake.'
Found on http://www.soundhome.com/glossary

Shingle

A unit composed of wood, cement, asphalt compound, slate, tile or the like, employed in an overlapping series to cover roofs and walls.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22195

Shingle

A unit composed of wood, cement, asphalt compound, slate, tile or the like, employed in an overlapping series to cover roofs and walls.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22196

Shingle

a wooden tile which has been used for roofing for several thousand years. Used in exactly the same way as clay/concrete tiles, traditionally in Britain they were oak, now mostly Canadian cedar. Soft woods have been used, and continue to be used in parts of the world, where they are usually c...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

shingle

Any rock fragments (small stones or pebbles) bigger than 2mm in diameter are classified as shingle. Unlike sand, shingle is not moved by the wind but by waves.
Found on http://www.conservancy.co.uk/learn/wordlist.htm

Shingle

In architecture, a shingle is a wooden tile, used for covering roofs, spires, etc, made of cleft oak. Shingles were formerly very extensively employed in some districts, but by 1850 their use had, for the most part, been superseded by more durable kinds of covering, They are however still to be found on some old church roofs, and on many timber spi...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TS.HTM

Shingle

Operational code name for the Allied landings at Anzio - January 1944
Found on http://www.secondworldwar.co.uk/glosss.html

Shingle

Shingle: In medicine, a small signboard outside the office of a doctor. The term has nothing to do with the disease shingles.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=40004

shingle

thin piece of building material, usually with a butt end thicker than the other. Shingles are widely used as roof covering on residential buildings ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/83

shingle

[n] - building material used as siding or roofing 2. [n] - coarse beach gravel of small water-worn stones and pebbles (or a stretch of shore covered with such gravel) 3. [n] - a small signboard outside the office of a lawyer or doctor, e.g. 4. [v] - cover with shingles
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=shingle
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