Scalping

Rough cleaning of paddy; removes most foreign material prior to drying and storage.

Scalping

is the removal of the finer fraction of a feed to a stone processing plant to reject unwanted material.

Scalping

Scalping is the act of removing the scalp, or a portion of the scalp, either from a dead body or living person, as a trophy of battle or portable proof of a combatant`s prowess in war. Although scalping in the United States is often associated with frontier warfare in North America, it actually has a historical basis throughout the world long bef....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalping

Scalping

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Scalp • a. & n. from Scalp.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/scalping/

scalping

<surgery> Scalping iron, an instrument used in scraping foul and carious bones; a raspatory. Scalping knife, a knife used by north American Indians in scalping. ... (06 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Scalping

Scalp'ing (skălp'ĭng), adjective & noun from Scalp . Scalping iron (Surg.) , an instrument used in scraping foul and carious bones; a raspatory. -- Scalping knife , a knife used by North American Indians in scalping.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/25

Scalping

Buying up the good IPOs.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfgloss.htm

scalping

removal of all or part of the scalp, with hair attached, from an enemy`s head. Historical evidence indicates that many cultures have engaged in the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/39

scalping

Removal of the scalp and hair from an enemy as a trophy. Scalping is usually associated with American Indian peoples, although it was relatively uncommon among them until the Spanish, French,...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Scalping

Scalping is slang for profiteering, particularly by re-selling tickets at an inflated price.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZS.HTM

scalping

scalping, taking the scalp of an enemy. The custom, comparable to head-hunting, was formerly practiced in Europe and Asia (Herodotus describes its practice by the Scythians, for example), but it is generally associated with North American natives, although many such groups did not take scalps. Most ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0843866.html
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