Proposition

The term proposition has a broad use in contemporary philosophy. It is used to refer to some or all of the following: the primary bearers of truth-value, the objects of belief and other `propositional attitudes` (i.e., what is believed, doubted, etc.), the referents of that-clauses and the meanings of sentences. Propositions are the sharable obj.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proposition

Proposition

• (n.) A statement in terms of a truth to be demonstrated, or of an operation to be performed. • (n.) A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed; as, the propositions of Wyclif and Huss. • (n.) That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy ma...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/proposition/

proposition

(from the article `epistemology`) ...distinctions: necessary versus contingent, analytic versus synthetic, tautological versus significant, and logical versus factual. These ... in logic, the attributing of characteristics to a subject to produce a meaningful statement combining verbal and nominal elements. Thus, a ... [18 related a...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/121

proposition

1. The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering. 'Oblations for the altar of proposition.' ... 2. That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy made propositions of peace; his proposition was not accepted. ... 3. A statement of religious doctrine; an article of f...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

proposition

noun a task to be dealt with; `securing adequate funding is a time-consuming proposition`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Proposition

Prop`o·si'tion noun [ Latin propositio : confer French proposition . See Propound .] 1. The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering. 'Oblations for the altar of proposition .' Jer. Taylor. 2. That which is proposed; that which is offe...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/176

Proposition

A proposition is a proposal or statement made for consideration, particularly a statement that affirms or denies something.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20541

proposition

a sentence or set of words that expresses a meaningful content.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm

proposition

a statement that affirms or denies and is true or false
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

proposition

A statement which can be assessed as being true or false, e.g. The sun is shining contains the proposition that 'the celestial body at the centre of the solar system is casting its light directly on the surface of the earth' and in any given situation this statement is either true or false.
Found on https://www.uni-due.de/ELE/LinguisticGlossary.html

proposition

a suggestion offered for acceptance or rejection
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/650288

Proposition

the content or meaning of an assertion or declarative sentence, which is capable of being either true or false.
Found on http://www.philosophybasics.com/general_glossary.html

Proposition

This word has been used to mean a declarative sentence (in some particular language); the content of meaning of a declarative sentence, i e., a postulated abstract object common not only to different occurrences of the same declarative sentence but also to different sentences (whether of the same language or not) which are synonymous or, as we sa.....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/p.html

proposition

[n] - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false 2. [v] - suggest sex to
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=proposition

Proposition

[See firstly predicate and proposition in our Psycholinguistics Glossary.] A proposition is that which describes a particular truth relationship between concepts [eg. 'cats have fur'], and which is thus 'the smallest unit of knowledge that can be judged either true or false' (Matlin, 1989). It follo
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20408
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