Mores

Mores (generally pronounced z, and often z; from Latin mōrēs, ˈmoːreːs, grammatically plural: `habit`; singular form: mōs) is a term introduced into English by William Graham Sumner (1840–1910), an early U.S. sociologist, to refer to norms that are more widely observed and have greater moral significance than others. Mores include an ave.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mores

Mores

• (n. pl.) Customs; habits; esp., customs conformity to which is more or less obligatory; customary law.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mores/

mores

(from the article `folkway`) Tradition, habit, and religious sanctions tend to strengthen folkways as time passes, making them more and more arbitrary, positive, and compelling. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/120

Mores

(Lat. mos, usage) Customs, Folkways, Conventions, Traditions. -- A.J.B.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/m.html

mores

(Latin) the customs and manners of a society. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

mores

noun (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Mores

Mo'res (mō'rēz) noun plural ; sing. Mos (mōs). [ Latin ] Customs; habits; esp., customs conformity to which is more or less obligatory; customary law.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/101

mores

A concept used in the behavioural and social sciences to refer to centrally important and accepted folkways, and cultural norms which embody the fundamental moral views of a group. ... Origin: L. Pl. Of mos, custom ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Mores

a society's standards of proper moral conduct
Found on http://wps.pearsoned.co.uk/wps/media/objects/2143/2195136/glossary/glossary

Mores

fixed morally linked customs; People
Found on http://www.africanculturalcenter.org/10_0glossary.html

mores

mores (môr'āz) , concept developed by William Graham Sumner to designate those folkways that if violated, result in extreme punishment. The term comes from the Latin mos (customs), and although mores are fewer in number than folkways, they are more coercive. Negative mores are taboos...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0834008.html

mores

the conventions embodying the fundamental values of a group
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/151399

mores

The cultural norms that specify behavior of vital importance to society and embody its basic moral values.
Found on http://archive.ifla.org/VII/s34/pubs/glossary.htm

mores

Type: Term Pronunciation: mo′rāz Definitions: 1. A concept used in the behavioral and social sciences to refer to centrally important and accepted folkways, and cultural norms that embody the fundamental moral views of a group.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=56029

mores

[n] - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=mores
No exact match found