monologue

  1. speech you make to yourself
  2. a long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation)
  3. a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor

Monologue

a text spoken by a lone speaker. In dramatic situations, this may be a 'one person show'; in other situations, it may refer to a speaker who monopolises the conversation.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Monologue

In theatre, a monologue (from Greek μονόλογος from μόνος mónos, `alone, solitary` and λόγος lógos, `speech`) is presented by a single character, most often to express their mental thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another character or the audience. Monologues are common across the range of dramatic ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monologue

monologue

[n] - a long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation) 2. [n] - a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=monologue

Monologue

• (n.) A dramatic composition for a single performer. • (n.) A speech uttered by a person alone; soliloquy; also, talk or discourse in company, in the strain of a soliloquy; as, an account in monologue.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/monologue/

Monologue

Mon'o·logue noun [ French monologue , Greek ... speaking alone; mo`nos alone, single, sole + lo`gos speech, discourse, le`gein to speak. See Legend .] 1. A speech uttered by a person alone; soliloquy; also, talk or discourse in company, in the st...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/95

monologue

a play for one actor; sometimes, a portion of a play. Example: 'Help, I Am,' a monologue (drama) by Robert Patrick, 1m.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20099

Monologue

A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy.
Found on http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/0072405228/student_view0/drama_glossa

monologue

A speech by one person on the stage, heard but not interrupted by the other characters on the stage (theatrical convention).
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Monologue

a speech for one person; in comedy, a stand-up comedy script
Found on http://www.comicalmanagement.com/pages/comical-terminology

monologue

a speech for one person; in comedy, a stand-up comedy script for a solo comedian.
Found on https://stand-upcomedy.com/glossary-of-stand-up-comedy-terms/

Monologue

An interior monologue does not necessarily represent spoken words, but rather the internal or emotio
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

monologue

in literature and drama, an extended speech by one person. The term has several closely related meanings. A dramatic monologue (q.v.) is any speech ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/113

monologue

monologue, an extended speech by one person only. Strindberg's one-act play The Stronger, spoken entirely by one person, is an extreme example of monologue. Soliloquy is synonymous, but usually refers to a character in a play talking or thinking aloud to himself, giving the audience information esse...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0833752.html

monologue

One person speaking, though the term is generally understood to mean a virtuoso, highly skilful solo performance. Literary monologues are often set pieces in which a character reveals his or her...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

monologue

One person speaking, though the term is generally understood to mean a virtuoso, highly skilful solo performance. Literary monologues are often set pieces in which a character reveals his or her personality, sometimes unintentionally (as in the dramatic monologue); in drama the soliloquy performs a similar function. A monologue can occur in a d...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038937.html

monologue

speech you make to yourself
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/153893
No exact match found