mold

  1. the distinctive form in which a thing is made
  2. container into which liquid is poured to create a given shape when it hardens
  3. loose soil rich in organic matter
  4. the process of becoming mildewed
  5. a fungus that produces a superficial growth on various kinds of damp or decaying organic matter

Mold

A growth of minute fungi on vegetable or animal matter, commonly seen as a fuzzy covering Ambient mold can naturally adhere to the casing of a cured meat. There is no danger in black, green, and blue molds that you find on the outer covering of cured meat, whereas red mold is a sign of spoilage.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21759

Mold

A mold (US) or mould (UK / NZ / AU / ZA / CA) is a fungus that grows in the form of multicellular filaments called hyphae. In contrast, fungi that can adopt a single celled growth habit are called yeasts. Molds are a large and taxonomically diverse number of fungal species where the growth of hyphae results in discoloration and a fuzzy appearance,...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mold

Mold

• (v. t.) Alt. of Mould • (n.) Alt. of Mould • (v.) Alt. of Mould • (n.) A spot; a blemish; a mole. • (n.) Alt. of Mould • (v. t.) Alt. of Mould • (v. t.) Alt. of Mould • (v. i.) Alt. of Mould
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mold/

Mold

(1) A condition created by the growth of various fungi during ripening, contributing to the individual character of cheese. Surface molds ripen from the rind inward. Internal molds, such as those used for Blue-veined cheeses, ripen throughout the cheese. A moldy character can be clean and attractive, or unpleasantly musty or ammoniated. (2) Refers....
Found on http://www.eatwisconsincheese.com/cheese/Glossary.xhtml?fc=M

Mold

(F moisissure, feutrage de champignons de petite taille, R mucegai). Woolly or powdery fungal growth that forms on the surface of materials in damp, stagnant atmospheres
Found on http://www.angelfire.com/biz/BuildingPathology/BldngPathGlsry.html

mold

(mōld) any of a group of parasitic and saprobic fungi causing a cottony growth on organic substances; also, the deposit of growth produced by such fungi.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

mold

clay sculpture noun sculpture produced by molding
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

mold

mould noun container into which liquid is poured to create a given shape when it hardens
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Mold

[cooking implement] A mold or mould is a container used in various techniques of food preparation to shape the finished dish. The term mold may also refer to a finished dish made in such a container (e.g. a jello mold). ==Molds can be used for a variety of foods== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mold_(cooking_implement)

Mold

[fungus] Mold (fungus) Paintings or Molded Paintings are works of art, created on traditional painting surfaces such as impregnated wall, wood and canvas, but instead of the traditional painting techniques, mold (fungus) is used to create the visual form. The works are created in a special environmental chamber where the specific conditions...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mold_(fungus)_Paintings

Mold

Mold noun [ See Mole a spot.] A spot; a blemish; a mole. [ Obsolete] Spenser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/88

mold

A downy fungal growth on a substratum, usually consisting of mycelium of a Hyphomycete or a Zygomycete.
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_M.htm

mold

A form of fungus. Some molds can cause disease in humans.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=M

Mold

A growth, often wooly in appearance, produced by saprophytic fungi on various forms of organic matter, especially when damp or decaying.
Found on http://www.winning-homebrew.com/brewing-terms.html

mold

A large group of fungi (like Penicillium) that cause mold (as on bread or cheese). A common trigger for allergies. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

mold

a wooly or furry growth caused by fungus
Found on http://insectzoo.msstate.edu/Glossary/

Mold

Formed template. Sometimes spelled in the trade as mould.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

mold

here, loose, soft, easily worked soil.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/l/lord-of-the-flies/study-help/full-

mold

in biology, a conspicuous mass of mycelium (masses of vegetative filaments, or hyphae) and fruiting structures produced by various fungi (kingdom ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/108

mold

in manufacturing, a cavity or matrix in which a fluid or plastic substance is shaped into a desired finished product. A molten substance, such as ... [17 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/108

mold

mold, name for certain multicellular organisms of the various classes of the kingdom Fungi, characteristically having bodies composed of a cottony mycelium. The colors of molds are caused by the spores, which are borne on the mycelium. Most molds are saprobes and can obtain moisture and nutriment fr...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0833608.html

Mold

Mold: A very large group of microscopic fungi that live on plant or animal matter. Most are filamentous organisms and produce spores that can be air-, water-, or insect-borne. A common trigger for allergies. For people who are sensitive to molds, exposure can cause symptoms such as nasal stuffiness, eye irritation, or wheezing. People with serious ...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=4416

Mold

The wooden form used by cigar rollers to give shape to a finished bunch of cigar tobacco. Some molds have two parts which are then placed in a press.
Found on http://www.victoryseeds.com/tobacco/backer_glossary.html

Mold

town, historic and present county of Flintshire (Sir Fflint), northeastern Wales, situated on a small stretch of farmland between the two industrial ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/108
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