eye

  1. attention to what is seen
  2. an area that is approximately central within some larger region
  3. a small hole or loop (as in a needle)

Eye

Two unrelated meanings: an undeveloped growth bud (as in a potato) or the center of a flower (as in a daylily).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20077

Eye

NavalEyes of a ship. The eyes of a ship are the extreme bows. The name comes from the ancient custom (still maintained in the Orient) of painting eyes on each bow so that the ship could see where she was going.
Found on http://www.britishempire.co.uk/glossary/e.htm

eye

[n] - attention to what is seen 2. [n] - good discernment (either with the eyes or as if with the eyes) 3. [n] - the organ of sight (`peeper` is an informal term for `eye`) 4. [n] - a small hole or loop (as in a needle) 5. [v] - look at
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=eye

Eye

The various parts of the eye are shown in a diagram (not included yet). Light entering the eye passes through (in order) the cornea, aqueous humour, pupil, lens and vitreous humour before striking the retina. Electrical signals from the retina are sent to the brain via the optic nerve. The pupil is actually a hole in the iris. The lens is held in ...
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Eye

An organ which is sensitive to light. See also: Ear, Ocular, Oculogyric, Visible Light.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/e/y/eye/source.html

Eye

The hole in a limekiln through which the burn lime was removed.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Eye

Eye: The organ of sight. The eye has a number of components. These components include but are not limited to the cornea, iris, pupil, lens, retina, macula, optic nerve, choroid and vitreous. The cornea is the clear front window of the eye that transmits and focuses light into the eye. The iris is the colored part of the eye that helps regulate the ...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=7021

Eye

Eye (ī) noun [ Prob. from nye , an eye being for a nye . See Nye .] (Zoology) A brood; as, an eye of pheasants.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/99

Eye

Eye transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Eyed ; present participle & verbal noun Eying or Eyeing .] To fix the eye on; to look on; to view; to observe; particularly, to observe or watch narrowly, or with fixed attention; to hold in...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/99

Eye

Eye intransitive verb To appear; to look. [ Obsolete] « My becomings kill me, when they do not Eye well to you.» Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/99

eye

<zoology> A brood; as, an eye of pheasants. ... Origin: Prob. Fr. Nye, an eye being for a nye. See Nye. ... 1. The organ of sight or vision. In man, and the vertebrates generally, it is properly the movable ball or globe in the orbit, but the term often includes the adjacent parts. In most invertebrates the years are immovable ocelli, or comp...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

eye

oculus noun the organ of sight
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

eye

(i) the organ of vision. In the embryo it develops as a direct extension of the brain, and thus it is a delicate organ; to protect it, the bones of the skull are shaped to form a round cavity. The conjunctival sac covers the front of the eyeball and lines the upper and lower eyelids. Tears constantly wash the eye ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Eye

• (n.) The center of a target; the bull`s-eye. • (n.) A small loop to receive a hook; as hooks and eyes on a dress. • (n.) Tinge; shade of color. • (v. t.) To fix the eye on; to look on; to view; to observe; particularly, to observe or watch narrowly, or with fixed attention; to hold in view. • (n.) That which resembles the...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/eye/

eye

(from the article `tropical cyclone`) A characteristic feature of tropical cyclones is the eye, a central region of clear skies, warm temperatures, and low atmospheric pressure. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/62

eye

Type: Term Pronunciation: ī Definitions: 1. The organ of vision that consists of the eyeball and the optic nerve; 2. The area of the eye, including lids and other accessory organs of the eye; the contents of the orbit (common). Synonyms: oculus
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=31255

Eye

[Centaur Publications] The Eye is a fictional comic book character created by Frank Thomas and published by Centaur Publications. The character had no origin story, and existed only as a giant, floating, disembodied Eye, wreathed in a halo of golden light. This super powerful being was obsessed with the concept of justice, and existed to en...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_(Centaur_Publications)

Eye

Eye is British slang for the anus.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZE.HTM

Eye

[Eve`s Plum Single] ===London=== Category:Featured picture nominations Category:Featured picture nominations/May 2007 ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_(Eve`s_Plum_Single)

Eye

Area in the center of a hurricane that is devoid of clouds.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/e.html

eye

The end loop of a bow string
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21056

eye

The center of a tropical storm or hurricane, characterized by a roughly circular area of light winds and rain-free skies. An eye will usually develop when the maximum sustained wind speeds exceed 78 mph. It can range in size from as small as 5 miles to up to 60 miles, but the average size is 20 miles. In general, when the eye begins to shrink in si...
Found on http://www.weather.com/glossary/e.html

Eye

The opening in a heddle for threading a warp end.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21174

eye

eye, organ of vision and light perception. In humans the eye is of the camera type, with an iris diaphragm and variable focusing, or accommodation. Other types of eye are the simple eye, found in many invertebrates, and the compound eye, found in insects and many other arthropods. In an alternate pa...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0818062.html
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