Enterobacter

Genus of enteropathic bacilli of the Klebsiella group. Not to be confused with the Family Enterobacteria of which they are members.

Enterobacter

<bacteria> Genus of enteropathic bacilli of the Klebsiella group. Not to be confused with the Family Enterobacteria of which they are members. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Enterobacter

(en″tәr-o-bak┬┤tәr) a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are widely distributed in nature and occur in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. They are frequently a cause of nosocomial infections.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Enterobacter

pneumonia a rare type of bacterial pneumonia, usually bronchopneumonia, caused by infection with species of Enterobacter; it is usually nosocomial and seen in debilitated patients.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Enterobacter

(from the article `drug`) ...and Proteus species. Cefamandole is active against many strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Enterobacter, while cefoxitin is particularly active ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/33

Enterobacter

Type: Term Pronunciation: en′tĕr-ō-bak′tĕr Definitions: 1. A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, motile bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods. The cells are peritrichous, and some strains have encapsulated cells. Glucose is fermented with the production of acid and ga...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=29378

Enterobacter

Enterobacter is a genus of common Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Several strains of these bacteria are pathogenic and cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised (usually hospitalized) hosts and in those who are on mechanical ventilation. The urinary and resp...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterobacter
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