Course

A single layer of brick or stone or other building material.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Course

Course can refer to: Course may also refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course

Course

normally A pair of strings placed together to be played with normal fingering
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

Course

• (n.) A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building. • (n.) That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments. • (n.) The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn. • (n.) The menses. • (v. t.) To cause to chase after or pursue game...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/course/

Course

(1) the term used for each application of material that forms the waterproofing system or the flashing; (2) one layer of a series of materials applied to a surface (i.e., a five-course wall flashing is composed of three applications of mastic with one ply of felt sandwiched between each layer ...
Found on http://www.rbroof.com/glossary-of-terms

course

(from the article `building construction`) ...areas by the use of salvaged Roman brick. The 14th-century bricks were not as precise as the Roman and were often distorted in firing. Therefore, ... The Egyptians possessed no lifting machinery to raise stones vertically. It is generally thought that the laying of successive courses of maso...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/151

course

(from the article `knitting`) ...and double knits—and the warp knits—including tricot, raschel, and milanese. In knitting, a wale is a column of loops running lengthwise, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/151

course

(from the article `navigation`) science of directing a craft by determining its position, course, and distance traveled. Navigation is concerned with finding the way to the desired ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/151

Course

- A row of shingles or roll roofing running the length of the roof. Parallel layers of building materials such as bricks, or siding laid up horizontally.
Found on http://www.homebuildingmanual.com/Glossary.htm

course

course of instruction noun education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings; `he took a course in basket weaving`; `flirting is not unknown in college classes`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

course

course of action noun a mode of action; `if you persist in that course you will surely fail`; `once a nation is embarked on a course of action it becomes extremely difficult for any retraction to take place`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Course

[architecture] A course is a continuous horizontal layer of similarly-sized building material one unit high, usually in a wall. The term is almost always used in conjunction with unit masonry such as brick, cut stone, or concrete masonry units (`concrete block`). ==Styles== Stretcher – The typical course style, masonry units are laid with...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(architecture)

Course

[education] In higher education in Canada and the United States, a course is a unit of teaching that typically lasts one academic term, is led by one or more instructors (teachers or professors), and has a fixed roster of students. It is usually an individual subject. Students may receive a grade and academic credit after completion of the ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(education)

Course

[food] In dining, a course is a specific set of food items that are served together during a meal, all at the same time. A course may include multiple dishes or only one, and often includes items with some variety of flavors. For instance, a hamburger served with fries would be considered a single course, and most likely the entire meal. Li...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(food)

Course

[medicine] In medicine the term course generally takes one of two meanings, both reflecting the sense of `path that something or someone moves along...process or sequence or steps`: A patient may be said to be at the beginning, the middle or the end, or at a particular stage of the course of a disease or a treatment. A precursor is a sign o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(medicine)

Course

[music] A course, on a stringed musical instrument, is two or more adjacent strings that are closely spaced relative to the other strings, and typically played as a single string. The strings in each course are typically tuned in unison or an octave. Course may also refer to a single string normally played on its own on an instrument with o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(music)

Course

[navigation] In navigation, a vehicle`s course is the direction over the ground the vehicle is currently moving in. The line connecting the vehicle`s consecutive positions on the ground is referred to as the track. The track the vehicle was intended to follow is called the route. The route is represented by the great circle line that connec...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(navigation)

Course

[orienteering] An orienteering course is composed of a start point, a series of control points, and a finish point. Controls are marked with a white and orange flag in the terrain, and corresponding purple symbols on an orienteering map. The challenge is to complete the course by visiting all control points in the shortest possible time, ai...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(orienteering)

Course

[sail] In sailing, a course is the lowermost sail on a mast. This term is used predominantly in the plural to describe the lowest sails on a square rigged vessel, i.e., a ship`s courses would be the foresail, mainsail, and, on the rare occasions in which one is shipped, mizzen. Gaff-rigged vessels may use the term (for the lowest sail rigge...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Course_(sail)

Course

Course intransitive verb 1. To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire. 2. To move with speed; to race; as, the blood courses through the veins. Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/174

Course

Course noun [ French cours , course , Latin cursus, from currere to run. See Current .] 1. The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage. « And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais. Acts xxi. 7. �...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/174

Course

Course transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Coursed (k?rst)); present participle & verbal noun Coursing .] 1. To run, hunt, or chase after; to follow hard upon; to pursue. « We coursed him at the heels. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/174

Course

A coffee that is rough on the tongue.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Life_Style/Coffee/

course

a connected series of events or actions or developments
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com

Course

A continuous horizontal band of stone of constant height.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/
No exact match found